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Harold L. Dibble
University of Pennsylvania
GeologyArchaeologyMousterianMiddle PaleolithicExcavation
175Publications
35H-index
3,940Citations
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Publications 166
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#1Tamara Dogandžić (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)
#1Tamara Dogandžić (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 4
Last. Harold L. Dibble (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 35
view all 7 authors...
About 10 years ago, a new experimental design, based on a mechanical flaking apparatus, allowed complete control over several independent variables essential to flintknapping. This experimental setting permitted the investigation of more fundamental aspects of stone technology, including the effect of particular platform attributes, core surface morphology, and the application of force on flake size and shape. These experiments used cores made of glass that were molded to exact configurations. H...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan Reeves (University of Tübingen)H-Index: 4
#1Jonathan S. Reeves (University of Tübingen)H-Index: 1
Last. Alain Turq (University of Bordeaux)H-Index: 20
view all 7 authors...
The use of space, both at the landscape and the site level, is considered an important aspect of hominin adaptations that changed through time. At the site level, spatial analyses are typically conducted on deposits thought to have a high degree of temporal resolution. Sites with highly time-averaged deposits are viewed as inferior for these analyses because repeated site visits obscure individual behavioral events. To the contrary, here, we take the view that behaviors that repeat themselves in...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kristen Wroth (BU: Boston University)
#2Dan Cabanes (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 18
Last. Harold L. Dibble (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 35
view all 8 authors...
The plant component of Neanderthal subsistence and technology is not well documented, partially due to the preservation constraints of macrobotanical components. Phytoliths, however, are preserved even when other plant remains have decayed and so provide evidence for Neanderthal plant use and the environmental context of archaeological sites. Phytolith assemblages from Roc de Marsal, a Middle Paleolithic cave site in SW France, provide new insight into the relationship between Neanderthals and p...
Source
#1Željko Režek (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)
#2Harold L. Dibble (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 35
Last. Sam C. Lin (UOW: University of Wollongong)H-Index: 12
view all 5 authors...
In the version of this Article originally published, the authors mistakenly included duplicate entries in the flake datasets for the new Pech de l’Aze IV and Warwasi collections, resulting in minor errors in the statistical analysis. The authors have now repeated this analysis with the correct flake datasets. As a result, in the following two sentences, the number of flakes has been changed from 19,000 to 18,000: “Using more than 18,000 flakes from 81 assemblages spanning two million years...” a...
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#1Sam C. Lin (UOW: University of Wollongong)H-Index: 12
#2Zeljko Rezek (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 9
Last. Harold L. Dibble (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 35
view all 3 authors...
Lithic researchers rely heavily on experimentation to infer past behaviors and activities based on stone artifacts. This paper explores the analogical nature of archaeological inference and the relationship between experimental design and inference validity in stone artifact experimentation. We show that actualistic flintknapping lacks vital aspects of scientific experimentation, and thus has inherent inferential issues of analogical adequacy and confidence. It is argued that a greater emphasis ...
12 CitationsSource
#1Harold L. Dibble (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 35
#2Sam C. Lin (ARC: Australian Research Council)
Last. Alain Turq (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 20
view all 4 authors...
Initially excavated in the early twentieth century, La Ferrassie is one of the most important sites for the Middle Paleolithic of Western Europe. Aside from the numerous Neanderthal remains found there, the stone artifacts recovered from the site are featured prominently in discussion and debates of Mousterian variability. Recent renewed excavation of the site, however, suggests a considerable preference in the kinds of stone artifacts saved during the initial excavation. Here, we assess the nat...
Source
#1Zeljko Rezek (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 9
#2Harold L. Dibble (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 35
Last. Sam C. Lin (UOW: University of Wollongong)H-Index: 12
view all 5 authors...
Temporal variability in flaking stone has been used as one of the currencies for hominin behavioural and biological evolution. This variability is usually traced through changes in artefact forms and techniques of production, resulting overall in unilineal and normative models of hominin adaptation. Here, we focus on the fundamental purpose of flaking stone—the production of a sharp working edge—and model this behaviour over evolutionary time to reassess the evolutionary efficiency of stone tool...
3 CitationsSource
#1Harold L. Dibble (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 35
#2Dennis Sandgathe (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 17
Last. Vera Aldeias (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 11
view all 5 authors...
Significant variability has been observed in the frequency of fire use over the course of the Late Pleistocene at several Middle Paleolithic sites in southwest France. In particular, Neandertals appear to have used fire more frequently during warm climatic periods and very infrequently during cold periods. After reviewing several lines of evidence and alternative explanations for this variability, the null hypothesis that these Neandertals were not able to make fire still stands.
7 CitationsSource
#1Harold L. DibbleH-Index: 35
#2Shannon P. McPherron (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 30
Last. Dennis SandgatheH-Index: 17
view all 4 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Paul Goldberg (University of Tübingen)H-Index: 52
#2Shannon P. McPherron (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 30
Last. Dennis Sandgathe (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 17
view all 4 authors...
From the outset of the Pech IV project, geoarchaeology played an integral role in the excavations.
2 CitationsSource
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