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Sabrina Servanty
Colorado State University
15Publications
9H-index
459Citations
Publications 15
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2019
Sarah J. Converse20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
Sabrina Servanty9
Estimated H-index: 9
+ 1 AuthorsMichael C. Runge31
Estimated H-index: 31
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Ecological Applications 4.38
Nicholas J. Lunn13
Estimated H-index: 13
(U of A: University of Alberta),
Sabrina Servanty9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CSU: Colorado State University)
+ 3 AuthorsIan Stirling62
Estimated H-index: 62
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Changes in the abundance and distribution of wildlife populations are common consequences of historic and contemporary climate change. Some Arctic marine mammals, such as the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), may be particularly vulnerable to such changes due to the loss of Arctic sea ice. We evaluated the impacts of environmental variation on demographic rates for the Western Hudson Bay (WH), polar bear subpopulation from 1984 to 2011 using live-recapture and dead-recovery data in a Bayesian implem...
Published on Jul 1, 2014in Ecological Applications 4.38
Sabrina Servanty9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CSU: Colorado State University),
Sarah J. Converse20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Patuxent Wildlife Research Center),
Larissa L. Bailey33
Estimated H-index: 33
(CSU: Colorado State University)
The reintroduction of threatened and endangered species is now a common method for reestablishing populations. Typically, a fundamental objective of reintroduction is to establish a self-sustaining population. Estimation of demographic parameters in reintroduced populations is critical, as these estimates serve multiple purposes. First, they support evaluation of progress toward the fundamental objective via construction of population viability analyses (PVAs) to predict metrics such as probabil...
Published on Apr 1, 2013in Animal Conservation 3.05
Olivier Gimenez39
Estimated H-index: 39
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique),
F. Abadi1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
+ 13 AuthorsPaméla Lagrange3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Université de Sherbrooke)
Published on Jan 1, 2013
Nicholas J. Lunn13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Eric V Regher1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 3 AuthorsIan Stirling7
Estimated H-index: 7
Published on Aug 1, 2012in Journal of Applied Ecology 5.78
Marlène Gamelon10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Lyon),
Jean-Michel Gaillard68
Estimated H-index: 68
(University of Lyon)
+ 5 AuthorsJean-Dominique Lebreton48
Estimated H-index: 48
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Summary 1. Harvest models are often built to explore the sustainability of the dynamics of exploited populations and to help evaluate hunting management scenarios. Age-structured models are commonly used for ungulate population dynamics. However, the age of hunted individuals is usually not recorded, and hunting data often only include body weight and sex limiting the usefulness of traditional models. 2. We propose a new modelling approach that fits data collected by hunters to develop managemen...
Published on Nov 1, 2011in Evolution 3.57
Marlène Gamelon10
Estimated H-index: 10
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique),
Aurélien Besnard17
Estimated H-index: 17
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
+ 4 AuthorsOlivier Gimenez39
Estimated H-index: 39
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Exploitation by humans affects the size and structure of populations. This has evolutionary and demographic consequences that have typically being studied independent of one another. We here applied a framework recently developed applying quantitative tools from population ecology and selection gradient analysis to quantify the selection on a quantitative trait—birth date— through its association with multiple fitness components. From the long-term monitoring (22 years) of a wild boar (Sus scrof...
Published on Aug 1, 2011in Journal of Applied Ecology 5.78
Sabrina Servanty9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CSU: Colorado State University),
Jean-Michel Gaillard68
Estimated H-index: 68
(University of Lyon)
+ 3 AuthorsOlivier Gimenez39
Estimated H-index: 39
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Summary 1. Demographic tactics within animal populations are shaped by selective pressures. Exploitation exerts additional pressures so that differing demographic tactics might be expected among populations with differences in levels of exploitation. Yet little has been done so far to assess the possible consequences of exploitation on the demographic tactics of mammals, even though such information could influence the choice of effective management strategies. 2. Compared with similar-sized ung...
Published on Jan 1, 2011
Published on Jul 1, 2010in Ecology 4.29
Sabrina Servanty9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique),
Rémi Choquet22
Estimated H-index: 22
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
+ 7 AuthorsOlivier Gimenez39
Estimated H-index: 39
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Whether different sources of mortality are additive, compensatory, or depensatory is a key question in population biology. A way to test for additivity is to calculate the correlation between cause-specific mortality rates obtained from marked animals. However, existing methods to estimate this correlation raise several methodological issues. One difficulty is the existence of an intrinsic bias in the correlation parameter. Although this bias can be formally expressed, it requires knowledge abou...
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