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Iván Mejía-Guevara
Stanford University
DemographyPopulationMalnutritionMedicineEnvironmental health
36Publications
8H-index
265Citations
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Publications 36
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Background: There is ample evidence that gender norms affect contraceptive practice; however, data are mostly qualitative with limited geographical scope. We investigated that association quantitatively using collective community-level attitudes towards premarital sex and wife-beating as proxies for gender norms. Methods: Data came from nationally representative Demographic and Health Surveys (2005-2009) for women of reproductive age (15-49 years) in nine sub-Saharan African countries. Using mul...
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#1Hannah Wild (Stanford University)H-Index: 1
#2Luke Glowacki (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 10
Last. Michele Barry (Stanford University)H-Index: 21
view all 9 authors...
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#1Ann M. Weber (Stanford University)H-Index: 8
#2Beniamino Cislaghi (Lond: University of London)H-Index: 5
Last. Geeta Rao GuptaH-Index: 14
view all 34 authors...
Summary Despite global commitments to achieving gender equality and improving health and wellbeing for all, quantitative data and methods to precisely estimate the effect of gender norms on health inequities are underdeveloped. Nonetheless, existing global, national, and subnational data provide some key opportunities for testing associations between gender norms and health. Using innovative approaches to analysing proxies for gender norms, we generated evidence that gender norms impact the heal...
11 CitationsSource
#1Iván Mejía-Guevara (Stanford University)H-Index: 8
#2Shripad Tuljapurkar (Stanford University)H-Index: 44
This study analyzes compression, convergence, and age-inequality of under-5 mortality patterns in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). We hypothesize that accelerated reductions in under-5 death rates are associated with substantive changes in the age distribution and variation of deaths. To analyze age variation rather than mean values for under-5 deaths, we adapted indicators of compression, convergence, and inequality that were developed for the total length of life. We constructed conditional life-tabl...
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#1Hannah Wild (Stanford University)H-Index: 1
#2Luke Glowacki (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 10
Last. Michele Barry (Stanford University)H-Index: 21
view all 9 authors...
Nomadic pastoralists are among the worlds hardest-to-reach and least-served populations. Pastoralist communities are notoriously difficult to capture in household surveys due to factors including their high degree of mobility, remote terrain, fluid domestic arrangements, and cultural barriers. Most surveys utilize census-based sampling frames which do not accurately capture the demographic and health parameters of nomadic populations. As a result, pastoralists are largely invisible in population...
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#1Iván Mejía-Guevara (Stanford University)H-Index: 8
#2Wenyun Zuo (Stanford University)H-Index: 11
Last. Shripad Tuljapurkar (Stanford University)H-Index: 44
view all 5 authors...
Background Despite the sharp decline in global under-5 deaths since 1990, uneven progress has been achieved across and within countries. In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for child mortality were met only by a few countries. Valid concerns exist as to whether the region would meet new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for under-5 mortality. We therefore examine further sources of variation by assessing age patterns, trends, and forecasts of mortality rates. ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Aditi KrishnaH-Index: 9
#2Iván Mejía-Guevara (Stanford University)H-Index: 8
Last. S. V. Subramanian (Harvard University)H-Index: 82
view all 5 authors...
We analysed socio-economic inequalities in stunting in South Asia and investigated disparities associated with factors at the individual, caregiver, and household levels (poor dietary diversity, low maternal education, and household poverty). We used time-series analysis of data from 55,459 children ages 6–23 months from Demographic and Health Surveys in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, and Pakistan (1991–2014). Logistic regression models, adjusted for age, sex, birth order, and place of residency, exa...
7 CitationsSource
#1Jocelyn E. Finlay (Harvard University)H-Index: 16
#2Iván Mejía-Guevara (Stanford University)H-Index: 8
Last. Yoko AkachiH-Index: 11
view all 3 authors...
In this paper, we examine the inequality in the dynamics of the total fertility rate within 21 sub-Saharan African countries by wealth quintiles. We also examine the associated inequality within each country in the proximate determinants of fertility–marriage, contraception, and breastfeeding. Applying Bongaarts’ proximate determinants of fertility framework, for 14/21 countries we analyze, we find that those in the richest wealth quintiles have had a more rapid decline in fertility rates than t...
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#1Jewel Gausman (Harvard University)H-Index: 4
#2Jessica M. Perkins (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 15
Last. S. V. Subramanian (Harvard University)H-Index: 82
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Objective Dietary diversity (DD) measures dietary variation in children. Factors at the child, community, and state levels may be associated with poor child nutritional outcomes. However, few studies have examined the role of macro-level factors on child DD. This study seeks to 1) describe the distribution of child DD in India, 2) examine the variation in DD attributable to the child, community and state levels, and 3) explore the relationship between community socioeconomic context and...
2 CitationsSource
#1Iván Mejía-Guevara (Stanford University)H-Index: 8
#2Wenyun Zuo (Stanford University)H-Index: 11
Last. Shripad Tuljapurkar (Stanford University)H-Index: 44
view all 5 authors...
Background: Despite the sharp decline in global under-5 deaths since 1990, uneven progress has been achieved across and within countries. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the Millennium Development Goals targets for child mortality were met only by a few countries, and recently new targets were set in goals for Sustainable Development that include the eradication of preventable deaths by reducing neonatal and under-5 mortality rates to at least as low 12 and 25 per 1000 live births by 2030, respectively. ...
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