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Jennifer L. Wittmeyer
North Carolina State University
8Publications
6H-index
316Citations
Publications 8
Newest
#1Mary H. SchweitzerH-Index: 24
Last.John R. HornerH-Index: 41
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Correction for ‘Soft tissue and cellular preservation in vertebrate skeletal elements from the Cretaceous to the present’ by Mary Higby Schweitzer, Jennifer L. Wittmeyer and John R. Horner (Proc. R. Soc. B 274 , 183–197. (doi: 10.1098/rspb.2006.3705)). The funding acknowledgement in the acknowledgement section was incorrect, and should read as follows: Funding for this work was provided by National Science Foundation (EAR-0541744), Discovery Channel and North Carolina State University.
#1Mary H. Schweitzer (NCSU: North Carolina State University)H-Index: 24
#2Jennifer L. Wittmeyer (NCSU: North Carolina State University)H-Index: 6
Last.John R. Horner (MSU: Montana State University)H-Index: 41
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Soft tissues and cell-like microstructures derived from skeletal elements of a well-preserved Tyrannosaurus rex (MOR 1125) were represented by four components in fragments of demineralized cortical and/or medullary bone: flexible and fibrous bone matrix; transparent, hollow and pliable blood vessels; intravascular material, including in some cases, structures morphologically reminiscent of vertebrate red blood cells; and osteocytes with intracellular contents and flexible filipodia. The present ...
#1Mary H. SchweitzerH-Index: 24
Last.John R. HornerH-Index: 41
view all 3 authors...
Unambiguous indicators of gender in dinosaurs are usually lost during fossilization, along with other aspects of soft tissue anatomy. We report the presence of endosteally derived bone tissues lining the interior marrow cavities of portions of Tyrannosaurus rex (Museum of the Rockies specimen number 1125) hindlimb elements, and we hypothesize that these tissues are homologous to specialized avian tissues known as medullary bone. Because medullary bone is unique to female birds, its discovery in ...
#1Recep AvciH-Index: 26
#2Mary H. SchweitzerH-Index: 24
Last.J. O. CalvoH-Index: 1
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Late Cretaceous avian bone tissues from Argentina demonstrate exceptional preservation. Skeletal elements are preserved in partial articulation and suspended in three dimensions in a medium-grained sandstone matrix, indicating unusual perimortem taphonomic conditions. Preservation extends to the microstructural and molecular levels. Bone tissues respond to collagenase digestion and histochemical stains. In situ immunohistochemistry localizes binding sites for avian collagen antibodies in fossil ...
#1Mary H. Schweitzer (MSU: Montana State University)H-Index: 24
#2Jennifer L. Wittmeyer (NCSU: North Carolina State University)H-Index: 6
Last.Jan K. Toporski (CIS: Carnegie Institution for Science)H-Index: 13
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Soft tissues are preserved within hindlimb elements of Tyrannosaurus rex (Museum of the Rockies specimen 1125). Removal of the mineral phase reveals transparent, flexible, hollow blood vessels containing small round microstructures that can be expressed from the vessels into solution. Some regions of the demineralized bone matrix are highly fibrous, and the matrix possesses elasticity and resilience. Three populations of microstructures have cell-like morphology. Thus, some dinosaurian soft tiss...
#1Mary H. SchweitzerH-Index: 24
Last.Seth H. PincusH-Index: 5
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We propose a three-phase approach to test for evidence of life in extraterrestrial samples. The approach capitalizes on the flexibility, sensitivity, and specificity of antibody–antigen interactions. Data are presented to support the first phase, in which various extraction protocols are compared for efficiency, and in which a preliminary suite of antibodies are tested against various antigens. The antigens and antibodies were chosen on the basis of criteria designed to optimize the detection of...
#1Recep AvciH-Index: 26
#2Mary H. SchweitzerH-Index: 24
Last.David S. McKayH-Index: 36
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We have developed a means of using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to repeatedly localize a small area of interest (4 × 4 μm2) within a 0.5-cm2 area on a heterogeneous sample, to obtain and localize high-resolution images and force measurements on nonideal samples (i.e., samples that better reflect actual biological systems, not prepared on atomically flat surfaces). We demonstrate the repeated localization and measurement of unbinding forces associated with antibody−antigen (ab−ag) interactions, ...
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