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María Martinón-Torres
University College London
PaleontologyEarly PleistoceneHomo antecessorPleistoceneBiology
132Publications
33H-index
3,888Citations
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Publications 132
Newest
#2Laura Martín-Francés (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 12
Last. Amélie VialetH-Index: 6
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Here, we present a metric and morphological study of the molar remains from the Montmaurin-La Niche mandible by means of microcomputed tomography. According to the last analysis, based on the combination of geomorphological and paleontological data, the level bearing this human mandible probably corresponds to the marine isotope stages (MIS) 7. These data place the Montmaurin-La Niche in a chronologically intermediate position between the Neanderthals and the Middle Pleistocene fossils ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Cecilia García-Campos (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 4
#2Mario Modesto-Mata (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 6
Last. José María Bermúdez de Castro (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 51
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Sexual dimorphism is an important component of the total variation seen in populations and plays a key role in taxonomic debates. In this study, microtomographic (microcomputed tomography) techniques were applied to a sample of hominin teeth from the Sima de los Huesos site (Spain). Dental tissue proportions of the permanent canines were assessed to characterize the pattern and degree of sexual dimorphism within this population. In addition, the possible similarities and differences wit...
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#1Laura Martín-Francés (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 12
#2María Martinón-Torres (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 33
Last. José María Bermúdez de Castro (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 51
view all 9 authors...
Dental enamel thickness, topography, growth and development vary among hominins. In Homo, the thickness of dental enamel in most Pleistocene hominins display variations from thick to hyper-thick, while Neanderthals exhibit proportionally thinner enamel. The origin of the thin trait remains unclear. In this context, the Middle Pleistocene human dental assemblage from Atapuerca-Sima de los Huesos (SH) provides a unique opportunity to trace the evolution of enamel thickness in European hominins. In...
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#1Frido Welker (UCPH: University of Copenhagen)H-Index: 12
#2Jazmín Ramos-Madrigal (UCPH: University of Copenhagen)H-Index: 7
Last. Marc de Manuel (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 7
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The phylogenetic relationships between hominins of the Early Pleistocene epoch in Eurasia, such as Homo antecessor, and hominins that appear later in the fossil record during the Middle Pleistocene epoch, such as Homo sapiens, are highly debated1–5. For the oldest remains, the molecular study of these relationships is hindered by the degradation of ancient DNA. However, recent research has demonstrated that the analysis of ancient proteins can address this challenge6–8. Here we present the denta...
4 CitationsSource
#1Laura Martín-Francés (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 12
#2María Martinón-Torres (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 33
Last. José María Bermúdez de Castro (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 51
view all 10 authors...
OBJECTIVES: Here we describe the case of an ectopic maxillary third molar (M(3) ), preventing the eruption of the M(2) , in the individual H3 of the hominin hypodigm of level TD6.2 of the Early Pleistocene site of Gran Dolina (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The fossil remains from the TD6.2 level of the Gran Dolina site (about 170 specimens) are assigned to Homo antecessor. Different geochronological methods place these hominins in the oxygen isotopic stage 21, between 0.8 a...
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#1Mario Modesto-Mata (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 6
#2M. Christopher Dean (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 42
Last. Juan Luis Arsuaga (Complutense University of Madrid)H-Index: 59
view all 11 authors...
Characterizing dental development in fossil hominins is important for distinguishing between them and for establishing where and when the slow overall growth and development of modern humans appeared. Dental development of australopiths and early Homo was faster than modern humans. The Atapuerca fossils (Spain) fill a barely known gap in human evolution, spanning ~1.2 to ~0.4 million years (Ma), during which H. sapiens and Neandertal dental growth characteristics may have developed. We report he...
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#1Robin Dennell (University of Exeter)H-Index: 31
#1Robin Dennell (University of Exeter)H-Index: 5
Last. Gao Xing (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 1
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Abstract This paper proposes a demographic history of China in the last glacial cycle. This history is complex because China lies in both the Palearctic and Oriental biographic realms, and experienced several immigration events before H. sapiens. Immigration by our species into the Oriental Realm of south China from southeast Asia probably began as early as 80,000 years ago. North China has a different history: here, humans immigrated from Mongolia and southern Siberia ca. 45,000 years ago as pa...
1 CitationsSource
#1José María Bermúdez de Castro (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 51
Last. María Martinón-Torres (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 33
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Here we present the descriptive and comparative study of two immature scapulae recovered from the TD6.2 level of the Gran Dolina cave site (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain) and assigned to Homo antecessor. This is the first time that data on the morphology and dimensions of the scapulae of a European late Early Pleistocene hominin population are provided. Considering the state of development and the linear dimensions, the scapula ATD6-116 could belong to a child of about 2–4 years. The morph...
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#1G. Richard Scott (UNR: University of Nevada, Reno)H-Index: 13
#2Joel D. Irish (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)H-Index: 23
Last. María Martinón-Torres (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 33
view all 3 authors...
Bailey et al. (1) describe a lower second molar with 3 roots in a Denisovan hemimandible dated 160,000 ka. The presence of a third root is stated to occur in <3.5% of non-Asians and in up to 40% of Asians and some New World populations. From this, they conclude the feature “provides morphological evidence of a strong link between archaic and recent Asian H[omo] sapiens populations. This link provides compelling evidence that modern Asian lineages acquired the 3-rooted lower molar via introgressi...
3 CitationsSource
#2Anna ClementH-Index: 5
Last. María Martinón-TorresH-Index: 33
view all 7 authors...
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