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Narelle Eather
University of Newcastle
PsychologyRandomized controlled trialPhysical therapyPhysical educationMedicine
69Publications
15H-index
919Citations
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Publications 69
Newest
#1Myrto F. Mavilidi (University of Newcastle)H-Index: 3
#2Connor Mason (University of Newcastle)H-Index: 1
Last. Nicholas Riley (University of Newcastle)H-Index: 7
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Despite well-established benefits, the majority of young people around the globe are not sufficiently active. In many countries, including Australia, physical activity (i.e. physical education and school sport) is not mandatory in the final two years of high school (i.e. senior school years). The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a time-efficient physical activity intervention on senior school students’ on-task behaviour and subjective vitality. This was a sub-study of the Burn 2 Lea...
1 CitationsSource
#1Angus A. Leahy (University of Newcastle)H-Index: 2
#2Madieke F.I. Michels (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)
Last. Jordan J. Smith (University of Newcastle)H-Index: 16
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The feasibility requirements of administering field-based cognitive assessments are rarely reported. We examined the feasibility of administering a group-based cognitive test battery in a school se...
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#1Tatsuya T. Shigeta (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 3
#2Angus A. Leahy (University of Newcastle)H-Index: 2
Last. Charles H. Hillman (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 60
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Abstract Purpose Participation in physical activity supports greater cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), a correlate of cognitive control. However, the relationship between muscular fitness (MF) and cognitive control is less clear. The present study investigated the differential relationship of CRF and MF with cognitive control in older adolescents. Methods This cross-sectional study involved students (15–17 years old, n = 541, 43% female) from 20 secondary schools who completed tests of inhibition...
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#1Angus A. Leahy (University of Newcastle)H-Index: 2
#2Myrto F. Mavilidi (University of Newcastle)H-Index: 3
Last. David R. Lubans (University of Newcastle)H-Index: 48
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PURPOSE: High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has emerged as a time-efficient strategy to improve children and adolescents' health-related fitness in comparison to traditional training methods. However, little is known regarding the effects on cognitive function and mental health. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of HIIT on cognitive function (basic information processing, executive function) and mental health (well-being, ill-being) outcomes for childre...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jordan J. SmithH-Index: 16
#2Nigel K. HarrisH-Index: 17
Last. David R. LubansH-Index: 48
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#1Narelle EatherH-Index: 15
Last. Angus A. LeahyH-Index: 2
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This study involved the design and evaluation of the High-Intensity Interval Training Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (HIIT-SQ). Phase 1: Questionnaire items were developed. Phase 2: Australian adolescents (N = 389, 16.0 +/- 0.4 years, 41.10% female) completed the HIIT-SQ, and factorial validity of the measurement model was explored. Phase 3: Adolescents (N = 100, age 12-14 years, 44% female) completed the HIIT-SQ twice (1 week apart) to evaluate test-retest reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis...
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#1Philip J. Morgan (University of Newcastle)H-Index: 53
#2Myles D. Young (University of Newcastle)H-Index: 14
Last. David R. Lubans (University of Newcastle)H-Index: 48
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#2Angus A. LeahyH-Index: 2
Last. David R. LubansH-Index: 48
view all 10 authors...
Abstract Physical activity interventions that promote cardiorespiratory (CRF) and muscular fitness (MF) may improve mental health in young adolescents. However, less is known about the links between fitness and mental health in older adolescents, as they are an understudied population. In addition, the association between MF and adolescents' mental health is less clear than it is for CRF. Our primary aim was to investigate whether MF is independently associated with mental health in a sample of ...
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