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Susan Goldin-Meadow
University of Chicago
317Publications
69H-index
16.1kCitations
Publications 318
Newest
Adolescence is a developmental period in which social interactions become increasingly important. Successful social interactions rely heavily on pragmatic competence, the appropriate use of language in different social contexts, a skill that is still developing in adolescence. In the present study, we used fMRI to characterize the brain networks underlying pragmatic language processing in typically developing adolescents. We used an indirect speech paradigm whereby participants were presented wi...
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#1Olessia Jouravlev (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 6
#2David Zheng (Princeton University)H-Index: 1
Last.Evelina Fedorenko (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 31
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Speech-accompanying gestures constitute one information channel during communication. Some have argued that processing gestures engages the brain regions that support language comprehension. However, studies that have been used as evidence for shared mechanisms suffer from one or more of the following limitations: they (a) have not directly compared activations for gesture and language processing in the same study and relied on the fallacious reverse inference (Poldrack, 2006) for inter...
3 CitationsSource
#1Paola Uccelli (Harvard University)H-Index: 14
#2Özlem Ece Demir-Lira (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 3
Last.Susan Goldin-Meadow (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 69
view all 5 authors...
This study examines whether children's decontextualized talk-talk about nonpresent events, explanations, or pretend-at 30 months predicts seventh-grade academic language proficiency (age 12). Academic language (AL) refers to the language of school texts. AL proficiency has been identified as an important predictor of adolescent text comprehension. Yet research on precursors to AL proficiency is scarce. Child decontextualized talk is known to be a predictor of early discourse development, but its...
28 CitationsSource
#1Anna ZhenH-Index: 1
#2Stephen Van Hedger (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
Last.Xing Tian (ECNU: East China Normal University)H-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Action and perception interact in complex ways to shape how we learn. In the context of language acquisition, for example, hand gestures can facilitate learning novel sound-to-meaning mappings that are critical to successfully understanding a second language. However, the mechanisms by which motor and visual information influence auditory learning are still unclear. We hypothesize that the extent to which cross-modal learning occurs is directly related to the common representational for...
1 CitationsSource
#1Lila R. Gleitman (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 41
#2Ann Senghas (Columbia University)H-Index: 17
Last.Susan Goldin-Meadow (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 69
view all 5 authors...
Logical properties such as negation, implication, and symmetry, despite the fact that they are foundational and threaded through the vocabulary and syntax of known natural languages, pose a special problem for language learning. Their meanings are much harder to identify and isolate in the child’s everyday interaction with referents in the world than concrete things (like spoons and horses) and happenings and acts (like running and jumping) that are much more easily identified, and thus more eas...
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#1Elizabeth M. Wakefield (LUC: Loyola University Chicago)H-Index: 5
#2Eliza L. Congdon (Bucknell University)H-Index: 6
Last.Karin H. James (IU: Indiana University Bloomington)H-Index: 20
view all 5 authors...
Producing gesture can be a powerful tool for facilitating learning. This effect has been replicated across a variety of academic domains, including algebra, chemistry, geometry, and word learning. Yet the mechanisms underlying the effect are poorly understood. Here we address this gap using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We examine the neural correlates underlying how children solve mathematical equivalence problems learned with the help of either a speech + gesture strategy, or a...
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#1Ö. Ece Demir‐Lira (UI: University of Iowa)H-Index: 1
#2Lauren Applebaum (Museum of Science)H-Index: 3
Last.Susan C. Levine (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 46
view all 4 authors...
4 CitationsSource
#1Dominic J. Gibson (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 3
#2Elizabeth A. Gunderson (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 15
Last.Susan Goldin-Meadow (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 69
view all 5 authors...
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#1Elizabeth M. Wakefield (LUC: Loyola University Chicago)H-Index: 5
#2Alana E. Foley (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 2
Last.Susan C. Levine (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 46
view all 6 authors...
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#1Dale Walker (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 17
#2Samantha J. Sepulveda (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 1
Last.Kathryn M. Bigelow (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 13
view all 13 authors...
Abstract Children vary extensively in their language skills at school entry, and a substantial part of this variation is due to disparities in language exposure prior to school. Because these differences have continuing impact on academic, cognitive and social development, prevention and intervention programs have been developed to address deficits in early experience with language and prevent continuing difficulties. We report the findings from a systematic survey of research on non-parental in...
1 CitationsSource
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