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Robert Schreuder
Radboud University Nijmegen
187Publications
43H-index
5,891Citations
Publications 188
Newest
#1E.G. Steenbeek-Planting (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 6
#2W.H.J. van Bon (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 5
Last.Robert SchreuderH-Index: 43
view all 3 authors...
We examined the instability of reading errors, that is whether a child reads the same word sometimes correctly and sometimes incorrectly, and whether typical readers differ in their instability from poor readers. With an interval of a few days, Dutch CVC words were read twice by typically developing first and second graders and reading-level matched poor readers. Error instability was considerable and second graders produced more unstable errors than first graders. Poor readers did not differ fr...
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#1Laura de VaanH-Index: 1
Last.Mirjam Ernestus (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 25
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Previous work has shown that novel morphologically complex words (henceforth neologisms) leave traces in memory after just one encounter. This study addressed the question whether these traces are abstract in nature or exemplars. In three experiments, neologisms were either primed by themselves or by their stems. The primes occurred in the visual modality whereas the targets were presented in the auditory modality (Experiment 1) or vice versa (Experiments 2 and 3). The primes were presented in s...
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#1Esther Hanssen (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 4
#2Arjen Versloot (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 4
Last.Robert SchreuderH-Index: 43
view all 6 authors...
In standard Dutch, the plural suffix -en is homographic and homophonic with the linking suffix -en (boek+en “books”, boek+en+kast “bookcase”), both being pronounced as schwa. In Frisian, there is neither homography nor homophony (boek+en “books”, pronounced with syllabic nasal; boek+e+kast “bookcase”, pronounced with a linking schwa). Seeing that many areas of Frisian grammar are subject to interference from Dutch, we investigated whether Frisian-Dutch bilinguals exhibit interference from Dutch ...
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#1Marlies de Zeeuw (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 2
#2Robert Schreuder (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 43
Last.Ludo Verhoeven (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 44
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We investigated processing strategies in the reading of Dutch compound words (e.g., ‘bezemsteel’ [broomstick]) by young first- (L1) and second-language (L2) learners in three grades of primary school. Turkish-Dutch bilingual children (L2) and Dutch monolingual children (L1) from second, fourth and sixth grade performed a lexical decision task in which the frequency of the whole compound, the frequency of the first constituent and the frequency of the second constituent was manipulated. We found ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Esther HanssenH-Index: 4
#2Arina BangaH-Index: 4
Last.Robert SchreuderH-Index: 43
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In Dutch, the linking element en in compounds is often homophonous with the regular plural suffix -en. Both are pronounced as [ә], [әn] or [ṇ] in different regions of the Netherlands. As a consequence, speakers of standard Dutch may interpret linking en in spoken compounds as a plural marker. The present study investigates whether the regional origin of the participants affects their interpretation of regional speech variants of linking en. In an auditory decision task, speakers from four region...
1 CitationsSource
#1Esther HanssenH-Index: 4
#2Robert SchreuderH-Index: 43
Last.Anneke NeijtH-Index: 8
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Previous studies reveal that young Dutch children display a [t]-bias in the middle of words in pronunciation (e.g. van der Feest 2007; Kerkhoff 2007). First graders, however, display a 〈d〉-bias in the middle of words in their writings (Neijt & Schreuder 2007). The present study investigates children’s spelling and pronunciation of word medial d and t to examine this apparent contrast. It turned out that first graders started with a 〈t〉-bias in their spellings while later on they displayed a 〈d〉-...
2 CitationsSource
#1Kimberley Mulder (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 3
#2Ton DijkstraH-Index: 12
Last.R.H. BaayenH-Index: 4
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Abstract This study investigated primary and secondary morphological family size effects in monolingual and bilingual processing, combining experimentation with computational modeling. Family size effects were investigated in an English lexical decision task for Dutch–English bilinguals and English monolinguals using the same materials. To account for the possibility that family size effects may only show up in words that resemble words in the native language of the bilinguals, the materials inc...
23 CitationsSource
#1Marlies de Zeeuw (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 2
#2Robert Schreuder (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 43
Last.Ludo Verhoeven (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 44
view all 3 authors...
We investigated written word identification of regular and irregular past-tense verb forms by first (L1) and second language (L2) learners of Dutch in third and sixth grade. Using a lexical decision task, we measured speed and accuracy in the identification of regular and irregular past-tense verb forms by children from Turkish-speaking homes (L2 learners) and monolingual Dutch-speaking homes (L1 learners). All beginning readers of Dutch had relatively more difficulties with the identification o...
5 CitationsSource
#1Vitória Piai (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 14
#2Lars Meyer (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 13
Last.Marcel C. M. Bastiaansen (NHTV Breda University of Applied Sciences)H-Index: 33
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Particle verbs (e.g., look up) are lexical items for which particle and verb share a single lexical entry. Using event-related brain potentials, we examined working memory and long-term memory involvement in particle-verb processing. Dutch participants read sentences with head verbs that allow zero, two, or more than five particles to occur downstream. Additionally, sentences were presented for which the encoun- tered particle was semantically plausible, semantically implausible, or forming a no...
7 CitationsSource
#1E.G. Steenbeek-Planting (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 6
#2Wim H. J. van Bon (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 13
Last.Robert Schreuder (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 43
view all 3 authors...
The effect of two training procedures on the improvement of reading accuracy in poor readers was examined in relation to their initial reading level. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 60 poor readers. Poor readers were assigned to a control group that received no training, or one of two training conditions. One training concentrated on the words the children read correctly (successes), the other on the words they read incorrectly (failures). They repeatedly read bisyllabic Dutch w...
4 CitationsSource
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