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David Levi-Faur
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
77Publications
31H-index
3,171Citations
Publications 79
Newest
#1Inbar Mizrahi‐Borohovich (HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)H-Index: 1
#2David Levi-Faur (HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)H-Index: 31
1 CitationsSource
#1Mattia Guidi (UNISI: University of Siena)H-Index: 1
#2Igor Guardiancich (Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies)H-Index: 6
Last.David Levi-Faur (HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)H-Index: 31
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1 CitationsSource
#1Nir Kosti (HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)H-Index: 1
#2David Levi-Faur (HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)H-Index: 31
Source
#1Hanan Haber (LSE: London School of Economics and Political Science)H-Index: 4
#2Nir Kosti (HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)H-Index: 1
Last.David Levi-Faur (HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)H-Index: 31
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AbstractThe study and provision of welfare have long been synonymous with direct social spending. The provision of welfare through regulatory means poses a complementary perspective to the study of social policy. In this context, this paper focuses on policies aimed at preventing mortgage borrowers’ eviction and repossession in Singapore, a world leader in state-led owner occupancy but a welfare laggard in terms of social spending. The findings show a disparity between a high rate of arrears on ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Nir KostiH-Index: 1
Last.David Levi-FaurH-Index: 31
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Source
#1David Levi-FaurH-Index: 31
3 CitationsSource
#1Hanan HaberH-Index: 4
#2David Levi-FaurH-Index: 31
Source
#2Nir KostiH-Index: 1
Last.Guy Mor
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Source
#1Kenneth W. AbbottH-Index: 26
#2David Levi-Faur (HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)H-Index: 31
Last.Duncan Snidal (University of Oxford)H-Index: 29
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18 CitationsSource
#1Kenneth W. AbbottH-Index: 26
#2David Levi-Faur (HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)H-Index: 31
Last.Duncan Snidal (University of Oxford)H-Index: 29
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Regulation is typically conceived as a two-party relationship between a rule-maker or regulator (R) and a rule-taker or target (T). We set out an agenda for the study of regulation as a three- (or more) party relationship, with intermediaries (I) at the center of the analysis. Intermediaries play major and varied roles in regulation, from providing expertise and feedback to facilitating implementation, from monitoring the behavior of regulatory targets to building communities of assurance and tr...
36 CitationsSource
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