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Nancie J. MacIver
Duke University
28Publications
13H-index
2,367Citations
Publications 28
Newest
Published on May 1, 2019in Cell Metabolism22.41
Kevin H. Lin4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Duke University),
Abigail Xie1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Duke University)
+ 12 AuthorsNancie J. MacIver13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Duke University)
Summary Crosstalk between metabolic and survival pathways is critical for cellular homeostasis, but the connectivity between these processes remains poorly defined. We used loss-of-function CRISPR/Cas9 knockout screening to identify metabolic genes capable of influencing cellular commitment to apoptosis, using sensitization to the BCL-2 inhibitor ABT-199 in BCL-2-dependent acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines as a proxy for apoptotic disposition. This analysis revealed metabolic pathways that...
Published on Apr 19, 2019in The Journal of Infectious Diseases5.04
Jennifer Rebeles2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
William D Green3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
+ 5 AuthorsMelinda A. Beck34
Estimated H-index: 34
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Published on Apr 15, 2019
Yazan Alwarawrah4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Duke University),
Amanda G. Nichols10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Duke University)
+ 1 AuthorsNancie J. MacIver13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Duke University)
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Immunity21.52
Kaitlin Kiernan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Duke University),
Nancie J. MacIver13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Duke University)
In this issue of Immunity , Sestan et al. (2018) show that viral-induced inflammation leads to insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, followed by compensatory hyperinsulinemia, which promotes the anti-viral effector response of CD8 + T cells. Interestingly, this leads to persistent glucose intolerance and the progression of type 2 diabetes in pre-diabetic animals.
Published on May 16, 2018in Frontiers in Immunology4.72
Yazan Alwarawrah4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Duke University),
Kaitlin Kiernan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Duke University),
Nancie J. MacIver13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Duke University)
Immune cell function and metabolism are closely linked. Many studies have now clearly demonstrated that alterations in cellular metabolism influence immune cell function and that, conversely, immune cell function determines the cellular metabolic state. Less well understood, however, are the effects of systemic metabolism or whole organism nutritional status on immune cell function and metabolism. Several studies have demonstrated that undernutrition is associated with immunosuppression, which l...
Published on Jan 1, 2018
Yazan Alwarawrah4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Duke University),
Nancie J. MacIver13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Duke University)
Obesity is characterized by changes in immune cell number, location, and function, and the recruitment of pro-inflammatory immune cells into adipose tissue. Both the adipocytes and immune cells recruited to adipose fat stores secrete pro-inflammatory hormones, cytokines, and chemokines with paracrine and endocrine effects that promote an overall inflammatory environment. This pro-inflammatory phenotype has deleterious effects on health and has been shown to promote insulin resistance leading to ...
Published on Mar 17, 2017in Journal of Biological Chemistry
Elyse A. Schmidt3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Brian E. Fee8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Durham University)
+ 8 AuthorsTimothy R. Koves35
Estimated H-index: 35
(Duke University)
Abstract The Immunity-Related GTPases (IRG) are a family of proteins that are induced by interferon (IFN)-gamma and play pivotal roles in immune and inflammatory responses. IRGs ostensibly function as dynamin-like proteins that bind to intracellular membranes, and promote remodeling and trafficking of those membranes. Prior studies have shown that loss of Irgm1 in mice leads to increased lethality to bacterial infections, as well as enhanced inflammation to non-infectious stimuli; however, the m...
Published on Feb 1, 2017in European Journal of Immunology4.70
Sivan Cohen5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Duke University),
Keiko Danzaki4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Duke University),
Nancie J. MacIver13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Duke University)
T cells are highly influenced by nutrient uptake from their environment, and changes in overall nutritional status, such as malnutrition or obesity, can result in altered T-cell metabolism and behavior. In states of severe malnutrition or starvation, T-cell survival, proliferation, and inflammatory cytokine production are all decreased, as is T-cell glucose uptake and metabolism. The altered T-cell function and metabolism seen in malnutrition is associated with altered adipokine levels, most par...
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