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Hester J. Lipscomb
Duke University
Human factors and ergonomicsOccupational safety and healthInjury preventionSuicide preventionMedicine
160Publications
33H-index
3,388Citations
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Publications 160
Newest
#1Luz S. Marin (University of Massachusetts Lowell)H-Index: 5
#2Hester J. Lipscomb (Duke University)H-Index: 33
Last. Laura Punnett (University of Massachusetts Lowell)H-Index: 48
view all 4 authors...
Abstract While there is a growing body of literature on assessing perceptions of safety climate, many of these studies report a company’s safety climate as a worker-based phenomenon. Discrepancies in perceptions of safety across different hierarchical groups in an organization may increase barriers to the development and implementation of effective ways to mitigate workplace hazards. This study examines and compares the perceptions of safety climate among three groups of construction personnel: ...
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#1Kristen L. Kucera (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 16
#2Ashley L. Schoenfisch (Duke University)H-Index: 16
Last. Hester J. Lipscomb (Duke University)H-Index: 33
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Background Despite wide availability of patient lift equipment in hospitals to promote worker and patient safety, nursing staff do not consistently use equipment. Objective To determine the influence of factors on the use or non-use of lift equipment during patient lifts/transfers. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting One university teaching hospital and two community hospitals in a large health system in southeastern United States. Participants 77 nurses and nursing c...
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#1Mette Lykke Nielsen (AAU: Aalborg University)H-Index: 5
#2Johnny DyreborgH-Index: 10
Last. Hester J. Lipscomb (Duke University)H-Index: 33
view all 3 authors...
ABSTRACTThere is broad agreement that precarious work is a growing problem, and that it is highly prevalent among young employees. The financial crisis in 2008 has reinforced the need for knowledge about how precarious work affects young employees. This paper explores how the concept of precarious work may apply differentially to different groups of young people at work and whether this challenges the term ‘transition’, which until now has been one of the core elements within contemporary youth ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ashley L. Schoenfisch (Duke University)H-Index: 16
#2Kristen L. KuceraH-Index: 16
Last. Susan Avent (Duke University)H-Index: 2
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BACKGROUND: Devices to lift, transfer, and reposition patients are recommended for healthcare workers' and patients' safety, but their intended use has yet to be fully realized. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe hospital nursing staff use of lift/transfer devices and the presence of factors at the time of lifts/transfers with potential to influence whether devices are used. METHODS: Participants were 108 US nursing staff in a university-based medical center and two community hospi...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kristen L. Kucera (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 16
#2Hester J. Lipscomb (Duke University)H-Index: 33
Last. Jennifer M. Hootman (CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)H-Index: 40
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Context: Health care workers have high rates of musculoskeletal injuries, but many of these injuries go unreported to workers' compensation and national surveillance systems. Little is known regar...
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#1Ashley L. Schoenfisch (Duke University)H-Index: 16
#2Hester J. Lipscomb (Duke University)H-Index: 33
Last. Leslie E. Phillips (Service Employees International Union)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
Introduction A rate-based understanding of home care aides’ adverse occupational outcomes related to their work location and care tasks is lacking. Methods Within a 30-month, dynamic cohort of 43 394 home care aides in Washington State, injury rates were calculated by aides’ demographic and work characteristics. Injury narratives and focus groups provided contextual detail. Results Injury rates were higher for home care aides categorized as female, white, 50 to <65 years old, less experienced, w...
1 CitationsSource
Background Safety climate, a group-level measure of workers’ perceptions regarding management's safety priorities, has been suggested as a key predictor of safety outcomes. However, its relationship with actual injury rates is inconsistent. We posit that safety climate may instead be a parallel outcome of workplace safety practices, rather than a determinant of workers’ safety behaviors or outcomes. Methods Using a sample of 25 commercial construction companies in Colombia, selected by injury ra...
5 CitationsSource
#1Ashley L. Schoenfisch (Duke University)H-Index: 16
#2Hester J. Lipscomb (Duke University)H-Index: 33
Last. Darrin AdamsH-Index: 17
view all 4 authors...
Introduction Despite the size and breadth of OSHA's Outreach Training program for construction, information on its impact on work-related injury rates is limited. Methods In a 9-year dynamic cohort of 17,106 union carpenters in Washington State, the effectiveness of OSHA Outreach Training on workers’ compensation claims rate was explored. Injury rates were calculated by training status overall and by carpenters’ demographic and work characteristics using Poisson regression. Results OSHA Outreach...
2 CitationsSource
#1Kristen L. Kucera (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 16
#2Karen G. Roos (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 11
Last. Barbara SilversteinH-Index: 34
view all 6 authors...
Background Little is known about the work-related injury and illnesses experienced by certified athletic trainers (AT). Methods The incidence and characteristics of injury/illness claims filed in two workers’ compensation systems were described from 2001 to 2011. Yearly populations at risk were estimated from National Athletic Trainers’ Association membership statistics. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were reported by job setting. Results Claims were predominantly for traumatic injuries and disorde...
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#1Bradley A. Evanoff (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)H-Index: 42
#2Ann Marie Dale (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)H-Index: 20
Last. Vicki Kaskutas (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)H-Index: 11
view all 7 authors...
Falls from height remain the leading cause of fatalities in residential construction. We used results from a comprehensive needs assessment to guide changes in fall prevention training in a joint union-contractor carpenter apprenticeship program; including surveys of 1018 apprentice carpenter and observational audits at 197 residential construction sites. The revised training utilized hands-on, participatory training methods preferred by the learners to address the safety gaps in the curriculum;...
11 CitationsSource
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