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Jonathan B. Losos
Washington University in St. Louis
283Publications
77H-index
20.2kCitations
Publications 283
Newest
#1Claire M. S. Dufour (Harvard University)H-Index: 2
#2Colin M. Donihue (Harvard University)H-Index: 8
Last.Anthony HerrelH-Index: 52
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#1Jens De Meyer (UGent: Ghent University)H-Index: 3
#2Duncan J. Irschick (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 45
Last.Anthony Herrel (UGent: Ghent University)H-Index: 52
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#1Simon Baeckens (Harvard University)H-Index: 8
#2Dylan K. Wainwright (Harvard University)H-Index: 6
Last.Jonathan B. Losos (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)H-Index: 77
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#1Jonathan B. Losos (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)H-Index: 77
The debate over the extent to which cats are an ecological problem and, if so, what solutions to pursue has become increasingly nasty. Underlying this unpleasantness has been a lack of enough good information. But there is a place where scientists do know, where research on cats and their impact and possible solutions has been deep and broad. That place is Australia, and two new books pro­vide insightful analysis of what we have learned and what can be done.
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#1James T. StroudH-Index: 9
Last.Jonathan B. LososH-Index: 77
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#1Robert M. Pringle (Princeton University)H-Index: 30
#2Tyler R. Kartzinel (Princeton University)H-Index: 11
Last.Rowan D. H. Barrett (McGill University)H-Index: 22
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Biological invasions are both a pressing environmental challenge and an opportunity to investigate fundamental ecological processes, such as the role of top predators in regulating biodiversity and food-web structure. In whole-ecosystem manipulations of small Caribbean islands on which brown anole lizards (Anolis sagrei) were the native top predator, we experimentally staged invasions by competitors (green anoles, Anolis smaragdinus) and/or new top predators (curly-tailed lizards, Leiocephalus c...
6 CitationsSource
#1Aurélien Lowie (UGent: Ghent University)H-Index: 2
Last.Anthony Herrel (UGent: Ghent University)H-Index: 52
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ABSTRACT The ability of an animal to run fast has important consequences on its survival capacity and overall fitness. Previous studies have documented how variation in the morphology of the limbs is related to variation in locomotor performance. Although these studies have suggested direct relations between sprint speed and hindlimb morphology, few quantitative data exist. Consequently, it remains unclear whether selection acts in limb segment lengths, overall muscle mass or muscle architecture...
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#1L. Ruth Rivkin (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 3
#2James S. Santangelo (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 5
Last.Marc T. J. Johnson (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 35
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11 CitationsSource
#1David N. Reznick (UCR: University of California, Riverside)H-Index: 62
#2Jonathan B. Losos (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)H-Index: 77
Last.Joseph Travis (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 51
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5 CitationsSource
#1Zachary D. Blount (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 10
#2Richard E. Lenski (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 87
Last.Jonathan B. Losos (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)H-Index: 77
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BACKGROUND Evolution is a strongly historical process, and evolutionary biology is a field that combines history and science. How the historical nature of evolution affects the predictability of evolutionary outcomes has long been a major question in the field. The power of natural selection to find the limited set of high-fitness solutions to the challenges imposed by environments could, in principle, make those outcomes deterministic. However, the outcomes also may depend on idiosyncratic even...
40 CitationsSource
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