Match!
Martin Reimann
University of Arizona
PsychologyMarketingCognitionConsumer neuroscienceSocial psychology
62Publications
17H-index
1,295Citations
What is this?
Publications 63
Newest
AbstractConsumer research suggests that cool products demonstrate autonomy by diverging from the norm. However, many products that diverge from the norm seem funny or simply bad rather than cool. What distinguishes products that look cool from those that look funny? We integrate prior research to propose a theory of how consumers respond to unusual product designs. Four experiments provide converging evidence that the design of cool products diverges from the norm in ways that make sense (i.e., ...
Source
#1David Flores (Tec: Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education)H-Index: 1
#2Martin Reimann (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 17
Last. Alberto Lopez (Tec: Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education)H-Index: 1
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Kyra L WigginH-Index: 1
#2Martin Reimann (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 17
Last. Shailendra Pratap Jain (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 9
view all 3 authors...
Given curiosity’s characterization as a motivational drive for knowledge, prior research has primarily focused on curiosity’s positive effects on knowledge exploration, information acquisition, and learning. Once the desired knowledge has been acquired, curiosity is said to be satisfied. But what happens if curiosity is left unsatisfied? Across five experiments, spanning four domains of indulgence-related decisions and relying on different methods of curiosity elicitation, the present research s...
2 CitationsSource
Brand betrayal is a state evoked when a brand with which one has previously established a strong self–brand connection fractures a relationship by engaging in a moral violation. We know little about whether brand betrayal is merely an extreme form of brand dissatisfaction or is a distinct state experienced differently from dissatisfaction. Herein, two studies shed new light into the experience of brand betrayal. A large-scale psychometric study shows that brand betrayal (vs. dissatisfaction) is ...
5 CitationsSource
#1Martin Reimann (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 17
#2Oliver Schilke (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 20
Last. Karen S. Cook (Stanford University)H-Index: 38
view all 4 authors...
Our article (1) presents evidence for the heritability of trust and the shared socialization of distrust. Goldfarb et al. (2) downloaded our dataset, which we had made publicly available for all researchers. We thank them for their reanalysis, which precisely replicated all point estimates reported in our article (1). Our reply focuses on three issues in response to their comments. Our original research investigated the heritability of distrust, and our finding of a point estimate of 0.00 [which...
Source
1 CitationsSource
#1Alberto LopezH-Index: 1
#2Martin ReimannH-Index: 17
Last. Raquel CastañoH-Index: 9
view all 3 authors...
#1Martin Reimann (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 17
#2Oliver Schilke (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 20
Last. Karen S. Cook (Stanford University)H-Index: 38
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Why do people distrust others in social exchange? To what degree, if at all, is distrust subject to genetic influences, and thus possibly heritable, and to what degree is it nurtured by families and immediate peers who encourage young people to be vigilant and suspicious of others? Answering these questions could provide fundamental clues about the sources of individual differences in the disposition to distrust, including how they may differ from the sources of individual differences i...
9 CitationsSource
#1Martin Reimann (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 17
#2Kristen Lane (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 1
The goal of this research was to test whether including an inexpensive nonfood item (toy) with a smaller-sized meal bundle (420 calories), but not with the regular-sized meal bundle version (580 calories), would incentivize children to choose the smaller-sized meal bundle, even among children with overweight and obesity. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect in a between-subjects field experiment of a toy on smaller-sized meal choice (here, a binary choice between a smaller-sized o...
1 CitationsSource
#1Martin Reimann (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 17
#2C. Clark Cao (UA: University of Arizona)
1234567