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Stefan Koelsch
University of Bergen
PsychologyCognitionChord (music)Cognitive psychologyMusical syntax
206Publications
57H-index
10.6kCitations
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Publications 206
Newest
#1Vincent Ka Ming Cheung (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 1
#2Peter M. C. Harrison (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 3
Last. Stefan Koelsch (University of Bergen)H-Index: 57
view all 6 authors...
Summary Listening to music often evokes intense emotions [ 1 , 2 ]. Recent research suggests that musical pleasure comes from positive reward prediction errors, which arise when what is heard proves to be better than expected [ 3 ]. Central to this view is the engagement of the nucleus accumbens—a brain region that processes reward expectations—to pleasurable music and surprising musical events [ 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 ]. However, expectancy violations along multiple musical dimensions (e.g., harmony...
8 CitationsSource
#1Michele Orini (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 16
#2Faez Al-Amodi (UCL: University College London)
Last. Raquel Bailon (Ciber)H-Index: 19
view all 4 authors...
Background: Emotions can affect cardiac activity, but their impact on ventricular repolarization variability, an important parameter providing information about cardiac risk and autonomic nervous system activity, is unknown. The beat-to-beat variability of the QT interval (QTV) from the body-surface ECG is a non-invasive marker of repolarization variability, which can be decomposed into QTV related to RR variability (QTVrRRV) and QTV unrelated to RRV (QTVuRRV), with the latter thought to be a ma...
Source
#1Vera Tsogli (University of Bergen)H-Index: 1
#2Sebastian Jentschke (University of Bergen)H-Index: 18
Last. Stefan Koelsch (University of Bergen)H-Index: 57
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Vincent Ka Ming Cheung (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 1
#2Peter M. C. Harrison (QMUL: Queen Mary University of London)H-Index: 3
Last. Stefan Koelsch (University of Bergen)H-Index: 57
view all 6 authors...
#1Stefan Koelsch (University of Bergen)H-Index: 57
Source
#1Stefan Koelsch (University of Bergen)H-Index: 57
#2Tobias Bashevkin (University of Bergen)
Last. Sebastian Jentschke (University of Bergen)H-Index: 18
view all 5 authors...
It is generally well-known, and scientifically well established, that music affects emotions and moods. However, only little is known about the influence of music on thoughts. This scarcity is particularly surprising given the importance of the valence of thoughts for psychological health and well-being. We presented excerpts of heroic- and sad-sounding music to n = 62 individuals, and collected thought probes after each excerpt, assessing the valence and the nature of thoughts stimulated by the...
Source
#1Vera Tsogli (University of Bergen)H-Index: 1
#2Sebastian Jentschke (University of Bergen)H-Index: 18
Last. Stefan Koelsch (University of Bergen)H-Index: 57
view all 4 authors...
How do listeners respond to prediction errors within patterned sequence of sounds? To answer this question we carried out a statistical learning study using electroencephalography (EEG). In a continuous auditory stream of sound triplets the deviations were either (a) statistical, in terms of transitional probability, (b) physical, due to a change in sound location (left or right speaker) or (c) a double deviants, i.e. a combination of the two. Statistical and physical deviants elicited a statist...
1 CitationsSource
#1Winfried Menninghaus (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 22
#2Valentin Wagner (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 13
Last. Stefan Koelsch (University of Bergen)H-Index: 57
view all 7 authors...
4 CitationsSource
#1Stefan Koelsch (University of Bergen)H-Index: 57
#2Peter Vuust (Royal Academy of Music)H-Index: 25
Last. Karl J. Friston (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 196
view all 3 authors...
We suggest that music perception is an active act of listening, providing an irresistible epistemic offering. When listening to music we constantly generate plausible hypotheses about what could happen next, while actively attending to music resolves the ensuing uncertainty. Within the predictive coding framework, we present a novel formulation of precision filtering and attentional selection, which explains why some lower-level auditory, and even higher-level music-syntactic processes elicited ...
18 CitationsSource
#1Liila TaruffiH-Index: 3
#2Stefan KoelschH-Index: 57
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