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Malte Meinshausen
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research
115Publications
44H-index
14.9kCitations
Publications 115
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#1Chris D. Jones (Met Office)H-Index: 52
#2Thomas L. Frölicher (OCCR: Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research)
Last.Friedrich A. Burger (OCCR: Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research)
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Abstract. The amount of additional future temperature change following a complete cessation of CO2 emissions is a measure of the unrealized warming to which we are committed due to CO2 already emitted to the atmosphere. This “zero emissions commitment” (ZEC) is also an important quantity when estimating the remaining carbon budget – a limit on the total amount of CO2 emissions consistent with limiting global mean temperature at a particular level. In the recent IPCC Special Report on Global Warm...
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#1Malte Meinshausen (PIK: Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research)H-Index: 44
#2Zebedee Nicholls (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 1
Last.Hsaing Jui Wang (Georgia Institute of Technology)
view all 24 authors...
Abstract. Anthropogenic increases of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are the main driver of current and future climate change. The Integrated Assessment community quantified anthropogenic emissions for the Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSP) scenarios, each of which represents a different future socio-economic projection and political environment. Here, we provide the greenhouse gas concentration for these SSP scenarios – using the reduced complexity climate-carbon cycle model MAGICC7....
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#1Joeri Rogelj (ETH Zurich)H-Index: 38
#2Daniel Huppmann (IIASA: International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis)H-Index: 11
Last.Malte Meinshausen (PIK: Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research)H-Index: 44
view all 8 authors...
To understand how global warming can be kept well below 2 degrees Celsius and even 1.5 degrees Celsius, climate policy uses scenarios that describe how society could reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. However, current scenarios have a key weakness: they typically focus on reaching specific climate goals in 2100. This choice may encourage risky pathways that delay action, reach higher-than-acceptable mid-century warming, and rely on net removal of carbon dioxide thereafter to undo their initial...
1 CitationsSource
#1Joeri RogeljH-Index: 38
Last.Malte MeinshausenH-Index: 44
view all 8 authors...
#1J. M. Kale Sniderman (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 8
#2Josephine R. Brown (BOM: Bureau of Meteorology)H-Index: 20
Last.Malte Meinshausen (PIK: Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research)H-Index: 44
view all 10 authors...
The previous ‘Journal peer review information’ for this Letter was incorrect. The correct statement is “Nature Climate Change thanks Jie He, Hanh Nguyen, Caroline Ummenhofer and other anonymous reviewer(s) for their contribution to the peer review of this work.” This statement has now been amended.
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#1Anders Levermann (PIK: Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research)H-Index: 37
#2Ricarda Winkelmann (PIK: Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research)H-Index: 17
Last.Roderik S. W. van de Wal (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 50
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Abstract. The sea level contribution of the Antarctic ice sheet constitutes a large uncertainty in future sea level projections. Here we apply a linear response theory approach to 16 state-of-the-art ice sheet models to estimate the Antarctic ice sheet contribution from basal ice shelf melting within the 21 st century. The purpose of this computation is to estimate the uncertainty that arises from large uncertainty in the external forcing that future warming may exert onto the ice sheet. While i...
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#1Elisabeth Vogel (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 2
#2Markus G. Donat (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 28
Last.Katja Frieler (PIK: Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research)H-Index: 31
view all 8 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1J. M. Kale Sniderman (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 8
#2Josephine R. Brown (BOM: Bureau of Meteorology)H-Index: 20
Last.Malte Meinshausen (PIK: Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research)H-Index: 44
view all 10 authors...
Climate projections1–3 and observations over recent decades4,5 indicate that precipitation in subtropical latitudes declines in response to anthropogenic warming, with significant implications for food production and population sustainability. However, this conclusion is derived from emissions scenarios with rapidly increasing radiative forcing to the year 21001,2, which may represent very different conditions from both past and future ‘equilibrium’ warmer climates. Here, we examine multi-centur...
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#1Sven Teske (UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)H-Index: 10
#2Thomas Pregger (DLR: German Aerospace Center)H-Index: 18
Last.Damien Giurco (UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)H-Index: 27
view all 7 authors...
The following section focuses on the main findings in all parts of the research, with priority given to high-level lessons, to avoid the repetition of previous chapters. The key findings as well as the research limitations and further research requirements are given for following topics:
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#1Sven Teske (UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)H-Index: 10
#2Malte Meinshausen (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 44
Last.Kate Dooley (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 3
view all 3 authors...
This chapter sets the context for the climate and energy scenario development. The first part summarizes the scientific status quo of climate change research and explains how the global climate has changed over recent decades and the likely outcomes if we continue with business as usual and fail to drastically reduce GHG emissions.
1 CitationsSource
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