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Serge Payette
Laval University
193Publications
45H-index
6,192Citations
Publications 193
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#1Serge Payette (Laval University)H-Index: 45
#2Mathieu Frégeau (Laval University)H-Index: 3
Abstract The distribution of vegetation zones in northeastern North America forms a gradual transition from closed to open forests, and to tundra. Closed forests near the open forest/tundra boundary generally correspond to residual patches of a once larger forest community. Whether these forest patches have survived as untouched, fire-free communities or as resilient communities during the Holocene remains unknown. To answer to this question, we reconstructed the successional history of two blac...
#1Pierre-Luc Couillard (Laval University)H-Index: 4
#2Joanie Tremblay (Laval University)H-Index: 1
Last.Serge Payette (Laval University)H-Index: 45
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Abstract Analysis and 14 C dating of charcoal fragments ≥2 mm buried in mineral soils make it possible to obtain a stand-scale portrait of Holocene fires that occurred in well-drained, fire-prone environments, as well as changes in forest stand composition over time, based on botanical identification of charcoals. However, it is not always possible to reconstruct all fire events, due to disturbances that altered soil stratigraphy. In order to evaluate the efficacy of this approach, we conducted ...
#1Serge Payette (Laval University)H-Index: 45
#2Vanessa Pilon (Laval University)H-Index: 4
Last.Mathieu Frégeau (Laval University)H-Index: 3
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The Arctic tundra extends beyond the treeline north of 58°N in eastern North America and north of 66°N in western North America and Eurasia. A marked exception to this distribution is the azonal tundra situated as far south as 54°30′–45′N, in the Pointe-Louis-XIV area (JABA), along the fast-rising coasts of James Bay–Hudson Bay. The unusual position of JABA calls into question the influence of climate as the main causal factor for its existence. Macrocharcoal remains extracted from tundra and fo...
#1Pierre-Luc Couillard (Laval University)H-Index: 4
#2Serge Payette (Laval University)H-Index: 45
Last.Mathieu Frégeau (Laval University)H-Index: 3
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Balsam fir (Abies balsamea) and black spruce (Picea mariana) forests are the main conifer forest types in the North American boreal zone. The coexistence of the two species as well as their respective canopy dominance in distinct stands raises questions about the long-term evolution from one forest type to the other in relation to environmental factors including climate and stand disturbance. We tested the hypothesis that repetitive fire events promote the succession of balsam fir forest to blac...
#1Serge Payette (Laval University)H-Index: 45
#2Mathieu Frégeau (Laval University)H-Index: 3
Last.Jason LaflammeH-Index: 2
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The long-standing hypothesis that sugar maple (Acer saccharum) communities are maintained at equilibrium by present climate and small-scale disturbances is questioned as empirical evidence is accumulating about the ability of the species to withstand several stand-scale disturbances. The fire history of a sugar maple site at the northeastern range limit of the species (Gaspe Peninsula, eastern Canada) was documented to test the hypothesis that this forest type is resilient to fire disturbance. T...
#1Serge Payette (Laval University)H-Index: 45
#2Ann Delwaide (Laval University)H-Index: 15
Abstract The lichen woodland (LW) is an open-crown subarctic forest distributed principally in North America where it extends from Newfoundland in Atlantic Canada to the Yukon and Alaska. It is the main tree ecosystem of the LW zone north of the closed-crown boreal forest zone, and south of the forest-tundra zone where its cover diminishes progressively toward the Arctic tree line. Growth and development of LWs are closely dependent on dry-mesic, nutrient-poor podzolic soil environments largely ...
Abstract The most direct way of deciphering the dynamics of an ecosystem is to examine its biotic and abiotic components based on analysis of living and dead organisms distributed above ground. The surface analysis method presented here provides a centennial to millennial stand-scale composition and disturbance history and is applicable in any wood-dominated ecosystem. A meticulous analysis of living and dead trees, and macroremains (charcoal, leaves and insect) laying above mineral soil was per...
#1François GirardH-Index: 21
#2Serge PayetteH-Index: 45
Last.Ann DelwaideH-Index: 15
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Field observations using chronosequences are helpful to study vegetation succession. This method allows to establish comparisons based on soil composition, stand structure, micro- and macrofossil remains from sites of different ages but on similar edaphic and topographic conditions. In the boreal forest, post-fire succession through time is triggered by climate, disturbance history (insect epidemics, fire and logging), latitude and altitude. The main objective of this research is to identify the...
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