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Kathleen L. Hourihan
Memorial University of Newfoundland
20Publications
9H-index
372Citations
Publications 20
Newest
#1Scott H. Fraundorf (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 9
#2Kathleen L. Hourihan (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 9
Last.Aaron S. Benjamin (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 25
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#1Nicole Burgess (WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)H-Index: 1
#2William E. Hockley (WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)H-Index: 24
Last.Kathleen L. Hourihan (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 9
view all 3 authors...
The effects of context on item-based directed forgetting were assessed. Study words were presented against different background pictures and were followed by a cue to remember (R) or forget (F) the target item. The effects of incidental and intentional encoding of context on recognition of the study words were examined in Experiments 1 and 2. Recognition memory for the picture contexts was assessed in Experiments 3a and 3b. Recognition was greater for R-cued compared to F-cued targets, demonstra...
#1Kathleen L. Hourihan (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 9
#2Elliott Bursey (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 1
ABSTRACTEmotional information is often remembered better than neutral information, but the emotional benefit for positive information is less consistently observed than the benefit for negative information. The current study examined whether positive emotional pictures are recognised better than neutral pictures, and further examined whether participants can predict how emotion affects picture recognition. In two experiments, participants studied a mixed list of positive and neutral pictures, an...
#1Kathleen L. Hourihan (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 9
#2Scott H. Fraundorf (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 9
Last.Aaron S. Benjamin (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 25
view all 3 authors...
Much is known about how the emotional content of words affects memory for those words, but only recently have researchers begun to investigate whether emotional content influences metamemory—that is, learners’ assessments of what is or is not memorable. The present study replicated recent work demonstrating that judgments of learning (JOLs) do indeed reflect the superior memorability of words with emotional content. We further contrasted two hypotheses regarding this effect: a physiological acco...
#1Mario E. Doyle (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 1
#2Kathleen L. Hourihan (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 9
ABSTRACTThe purpose of this study was to see how people perceive their own learning during a category learning task, and whether their perceptions matched their performance. In two experiments, participants were asked to learn natural categories, of both high and low variability, and make category learning judgements (CLJs). Variability was manipulated by varying the number of exemplars and the number of times each exemplar was presented within each category. Experiment 1 showed that participant...
One of the most common memory failures that we experience is in remembering the names of people we have just met. Most of us can think of instances in which we have been introduced to people but soon found ourselves unable to remember their name. Research has thus far failed to find a simple way to improve memory for face-name pairings. The current study investigated whether an easy-to-implement technique-production-can improve memory for names paired with faces.Past research has identified enco...
#1Kathleen L. Hourihan (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 9
#2Jonathan G. Tullis (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 10
Although it is well known that organized lists of words (e.g., categories) are recalled better than unrelated lists, little research has examined whether participants can predict how categorical relatedness influences recall. In two experiments, participants studied lists of words that included items from big categories (12 items), small categories (4 items), and unrelated items, and provided immediate JOLs. In Experiment 1, free recall was highest for items from large categories and lowest for ...
#1Kathleen L. Hourihan (MUN: Memorial University of Newfoundland)H-Index: 9
#2Aaron S. Benjamin (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 25
Although there is an abundance of research on how stimulus characteristics and encoding conditions affect metamemory, and how those effects either do or do not mirror effects on memory, there is little research on whether and how characteristics of participants' states—like mood, fatigue, or hunger—affect metamemory. The present study examined whether metamemory ability fluctuates with time of day. Specifically, we evaluated whether learners can successfully account for the effects of time of da...
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