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Péter Batáry
University of Göttingen
119Publications
35H-index
5,146Citations
Publications 122
Newest
#1Johan Ekroos (Lund University)H-Index: 20
#2David Kleijn (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 48
Last.Henrik G. Smith (Lund University)H-Index: 57
view all 9 authors...
Abstract There is widespread concern regarding declines in bee populations given their importance for the functioning of both natural and managed ecosystems. An increasing number of studies find negative relations between bee species richness and simplification of agricultural landscapes, but the role of land-use intensity and its relative importance compared to landscape simplification remain less clear. We compared the relative effects of nitrogen inputs, as a proxy for land-use intensity, and...
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#1Johan EkroosH-Index: 20
#2David KleijnH-Index: 48
Last.Henrik G. SmithH-Index: 57
view all 9 authors...
There is widespread concern regarding declines in bee populations given their importance for the functioning of both natural and managed ecosystems. An increasing number of studies find negative relations between bee species richness and simplification of agricultural landscapes, but the role of land-use intensity and its relative importance compared to landscape simplification remain less clear. We compared the relative effects of nitrogen inputs, as a proxy for land-use intensity, and proporti...
#1Christoph GayerH-Index: 2
#2Gábor L. Lövei (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 30
Last.Péter Batáry (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 35
view all 5 authors...
Abstract The continued decline in farmland biodiversity in Europe despite substantial funding for agri-environment schemes (AES) has prompted calls for more effective biodiversity conservation measures. The current AES regime allows for both holistic measures, such as organic farming, that broadly target the agricultural environment and biodiversity-specific measures, such as flowering fields, but little is known of their relative efficacies. To address this gap, we studied carabids in 48 arable...
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#1Julie DayH-Index: 6
#2Raman KumarH-Index: 2
Last.Carlos A. PeresH-Index: 86
view all 514 authors...
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#1Riho Marja (EA: Environment Agency)H-Index: 5
#2David Kleijn (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 48
Last.Péter Batáry (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 35
view all 6 authors...
Agri-environment management (AEM) started in the 1980s in Europe to mitigate biodiversity decline, but the effectiveness of AEM has been questioned. We hypothesize that this is caused by a lack of a large enough ecological contrast between AEM and non-treated control sites. The effectiveness of AEM may be moderated by landscape structure and land-use intensity. Here, we examined the influence of local ecological contrast, landscape structure and regional land-use intensity on AEM effectiveness i...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kevin Darras (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 9
#2Péter Batáry (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 35
Last.Teja Tscharntke (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 105
view all 6 authors...
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#1Clélia Sirami (University of Toulouse)H-Index: 16
#2Nicolas Gross (URJC: King Juan Carlos University)H-Index: 24
Last.Lenore Fahrig (Carleton University)H-Index: 72
view all 48 authors...
Agricultural landscape homogenization has detrimental effects on biodiversity and key ecosystem services. Increasing agricultural landscape heterogeneity by increasing seminatural cover can help to mitigate biodiversity loss. However, the amount of seminatural cover is generally low and difficult to increase in many intensively managed agricultural landscapes. We hypothesized that increasing the heterogeneity of the crop mosaic itself (hereafter “crop heterogeneity”) can also have positive effec...
6 CitationsSource
#1Emily A. Martin (University of Würzburg)H-Index: 11
#2Matteo DaineseH-Index: 14
Last.Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter (University of Würzburg)H-Index: 78
view all 65 authors...
Managing agricultural landscapes to support biodiversity and ecosystem services is a key aim of a sustainable agriculture. However, how the spatial arrangement of crop fields and other habitats in landscapes impacts arthropods and their functions is poorly known. Synthesising data from 49 studies (1515 landscapes) across Europe, we examined effects of landscape composition (% habitats) and configuration (edge density) on arthropods in fields and their margins, pest control, pollination and yield...
5 CitationsSource
#1Christoph GayerH-Index: 2
#2Kornélia Kurucz (PTE: University of Pécs)H-Index: 10
Last.Péter Batáry (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 35
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Agricultural intensification constrains the occurrences of birds from local through landscape to regional scales. Here, we tested effects of landscape configuration (comparing regions with small vs. large field size, thereby contrasting former West and East Germany), local farming practice (organic vs. conventional) and within-field position (edge vs. centre) on the abundance and species richness of farmland birds in winter wheat fields, with particular reference to skylarks (Alauda arv...
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#1María Rosa Rossetti (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 4
#2Verena Rösch (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 7
Last.Péter Batáry (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 35
view all 5 authors...
Herbivory is one of the most important antagonistic insect–plant interactions and can be influenced by factors at local and landscape scales. Landscape fragmentation may reduce herbivory directly (i.e., decreasing abundance and species richness of herbivores), but also indirectly increase herbivory (i.e., releasing herbivores from top‐down control). At a local scale, reduced plant diversity may enhance herbivory through lessened associated resistance, while resource availability (i.e., higher ve...
1 CitationsSource
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