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Chester A. Insko
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Social relationDevelopmental psychologyPsychologyDiscontinuity (linguistics)Social psychology
131Publications
49H-index
5,625Citations
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Publications 134
Newest
#1Erin Cooley (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 6
#2Andrew Rea (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 1
Last. B. Keith Payne (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 32
view all 4 authors...
According to interdependence theory, interpersonal situations that vary in their surface characteristics can be united by similarities in their underlying structure. Likewise, factor analytic approaches to personality combine many traits into a small number of factors. In the current research, we use interdependence theory and existing factor analyses of personality traits to measure people's lay theories about the ways traits and situations interact. We predict that traits representative of hon...
1 CitationsSource
#1Chester A. Insko (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 49
#2Tim Wildschut (University of Southampton)H-Index: 36
Last. Taya R. Cohen (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 17
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In two experiments with the PDG we manipulated the Campbell (1958), or Wertheimer (1923), indices of entitativity (common fate, proximity, and similarity) to examine when a set of individuals interacts with another set of individuals in the competitive manner that is characteristic of group-on-group interactions. Experiment 1 found that interactions between two 3-person sets were more competitive when participants within each set shared (versus did not share) common fate. In Experiment 2, the We...
15 CitationsSource
#2John SchoplerH-Index: 26
Last. Chester A. InskoH-Index: 3
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Contents: C. Sedikides, J. Schopler, C.A. InskoIntroduction. Part I:Intergroup Cognition and Intergroup Behavior: Conceptual Issues. M. Schaller, M.C. Rosell, C.H. Asp, Parsimony and Pluralism in the Psychological Study of Intergroup Processes. D. Wilder, A.F. Simon, Categorical and Dynamic Groups: Implications for Social Perception and Intergroup Behavior. Part II:Interindividual Versus Intergroup Cognition and Behavior. D.L. Hamilton, S.J. Sherman, B. Lickel, Perceiving Social Groups: The Impo...
256 CitationsSource
#2John SchoplerH-Index: 26
Last. Chester A. InskoH-Index: 49
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Taya R. CohenH-Index: 17
#2Chester A. InskoH-Index: 49
A hotel and its employees have a dispute regarding wages, so the employees go on strike. Republicans and Democrats cannot come to terms on a health care bill, so the legislation languishes in Congress. Two countries have ideological and political disagreements, so they decide to go to war. All of these are examples of destructive intergroup conflict. In this chapter we outline several approaches to reducing intergroup conflict grounded in psychological research. The conflict reduction methods we...
Source
#1Taya R. Cohen (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 17
#2Scott T. Wolf (Harris Interactive Inc.)H-Index: 5
Last. Chester A. Insko (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 49
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Although scholars agree that moral emotions are critical for deterring unethical and antisocial behavior, there is disagreement about how two prototypical moral emotions — guilt and shame — should be defined, differentiated, and measured. We addressed these issues by developing a new assessment — the Guilt And Shame Proneness scale (GASP) — that measures individual differences in the propensity to experience guilt and shame across a range of personal transgressions. The GASP contains two guilt s...
223 CitationsSource
#1Scott T. Wolf (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 5
#2Taya R. Cohen (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 17
Last. Chester A. Insko (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 49
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In Study 1, participants completed five extant shame and guilt proneness inventories based on different theoretical conceptions of the difference between shame and guilt. Factor analyses revealed that despite very different theoretical distinctions, the shame proneness subscales loaded on one factor, and the guilt proneness subscales loaded on one factor. In Study 2, we altered scale items so that hypothetical transgressions were committed in either public or private, and likelihood response opt...
58 CitationsSource
#1Tim WildschutH-Index: 36
#2Chester A. InskoH-Index: 49
#1Taya R. Cohen (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 17
#2Brian P. Meier (Gettysburg College)H-Index: 31
Last. Chester A. Insko (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 49
view all 4 authors...
Groups are different from the sum of their parts. Three decades of research comparing interindividual and intergroup behavior has revealed that interactions between groups are more competitive and less cooperative than interactions between individuals in mixed-motive situations. This finding has been labeled the interindividual-intergroup discontinuity effect because there is a discontinuity, or disconnect, between how individuals behave in one-on-one interactions relative to how groups behave i...
1 Citations
#1Taya R. Cohen (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 17
#2Tim Wildschut (University of Southampton)H-Index: 36
Last. Chester A. Insko (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 49
view all 3 authors...
Evidence from two experiments indicates that task-related communication promotes cooperation in mixed-motive situations by activating interpersonal norms related to fairness and trust. In Experiment 1, task-related communication increased cooperation between individuals in a three-choice prisoner’s dilemma game (PDG-Alt) but task-unrelated communication did not. In Experiment 2, cooperation was increased both by sending a task-related message to one’s counterpart and receiving a cooperative task...
36 CitationsSource
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