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Roy F. Baurneister
Case Western Reserve University
674Publications
130H-index
83.9kCitations
Publications 674
Newest
Published on Jun 22, 2018in Self and Identity 1.44
Roy F. Baurneister130
Estimated H-index: 130
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Bradley R. Entner Wright18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UConn: University of Connecticut),
David M. Carreon1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Stanford University)
AbstractAn experience sampling study with a large community sample (N = 3327) furnished data on trait and state self-control in everyday life. State measures were self-reports of ego-depleting events (restraining self, effortful decisions, and pushing self to do unwanted tasks) and feelings of depletion (emotional overreactions, difficulty making up mind, less mental energy). People with high trait self-control reported fewer such feelings and events than others. Poor sleep quality and interpers...
Michail D. Kokkoris4
Estimated H-index: 4
(WU: Vienna University of Economics and Business),
Roy F. Baurneister130
Estimated H-index: 130
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Ulrich Kühnen14
Estimated H-index: 14
(JU: Jacobs University Bremen)
Abstract Does belief in free will free or freeze decision-making? The existentialist hypothesis, rooted in views of free will as a source of anguish and hesitation, would predict that free will impedes decisions by increasing indecisiveness. In contrast, the evolutionary hypothesis, rooted in views of free will as a driver of effective social functioning, would predict that free will facilitates decisions by reducing indecisiveness. Results of five studies using various measures of indecisivenes...
Tania Reynolds3
Estimated H-index: 3
(IU: Indiana University),
Chuck Howard (UBC: University of British Columbia)+ -3 AuthorsJonghan Kim
Moral typecasting is the tendency to categorize intentional perpetrators and suffering victims within moral interactions. We predicted a bias in typecasting, such that women are more easily typecas...
Published on Apr 26, 2019in Motivation and Emotion 1.46
Hallgeir Sjåstad1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NHH: Norwegian School of Economics),
Roy F. Baurneister130
Estimated H-index: 130
(FSU: Florida State University)
When, if ever, would a person want to be held responsible for his or her choices? Across four studies (N = 915), people favored more extreme rewards and punishments for their future than their past actions. This included thinking that they should receive more blame and punishment for future misdeeds than for past ones, and more credit and reward for future good deeds than for past ones. The tendency to moralize the future more than the past was mediated by anticipating (one’s own) emotional reac...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Motivation and Emotion 1.46
Michael J. MacKenzie4
Estimated H-index: 4
(FSU: Florida State University),
Roy F. Baurneister130
Estimated H-index: 130
(FSU: Florida State University)
Three studies examined effects of social exclusion on reactions to receiving an unexpected gift. Trait Psychological Entitlement was also measured as a potential moderator in all studies. In Study 1, participants wrote about a time they felt rejected, accepted, or something neutral. Compared to the control condition, social exclusion increased self-reported gratitude and observer-rated gratitude. These effects were found among people scoring low on narcissistic entitlement. For these participant...
Published on May 7, 2019in Journal of Business Ethics 3.80
Carolin Baur (JU: Jacobs University Bremen), Carolin Baur + 1 AuthorsRoy F. Baurneister130
Estimated H-index: 130
Previous research indicates that the depletion of self-regulatory resources can promote unethical behavior that benefits the self. Extending this literature, we focus on norm-transgressing behavior that is intended to primarily benefit others. In particular, we predicted a differing effect of self-regulatory resource depletion on dishonesty that benefits one’s group, depending on the degree of identification with the group. Following a dual process approach, we argue that if identification with ...
Published on Apr 26, 2019
Jan-Willem van Prooijen20
Estimated H-index: 20
(International Business Broker's Association),
Joseph P. Forgas55
Estimated H-index: 55
,
Roy F. Baurneister130
Estimated H-index: 130
In this chapter, we consider the factors that attract people toward conspiracy theories and also consider whether or not belief in conspiracy theories is a sign of gullibility. We first review the framework of Douglas, Sutton, and Cichocka (2017), which explains that belief in conspiracy theories is driven by epistemic, existential, and social motives. In reviewing the literature on the psychology of conspiracy belief, we conclude that people who believe in conspiracy theories will not simply be...
Published on Apr 3, 2019
Roy F. Baurneister130
Estimated H-index: 130
,
Jessica A. Maxwell + 1 AuthorsKathleen D. Vohs65
Estimated H-index: 65
Published on Apr 26, 2019
Joseph P. Forgas55
Estimated H-index: 55
,
Roy F. Baurneister130
Estimated H-index: 130
Gullibility, whether we like it or not, is a fundamental characteristic of human beings. In The Social Psychology of Gullibility, Forgas and Baumeister explore what we know about the causes, functions, and consequences of gullibility, and the social psychological processes that promote or inhibit it. With contributions from leading international researchers, the book reveals what social and cognitive psychology contribute to our understanding of how human judgments and decisions can be distorted...
Published on Apr 26, 2019
Joseph P. Forgas55
Estimated H-index: 55
,
Roy F. Baurneister130
Estimated H-index: 130
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