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Roy F. Baurneister
Case Western Reserve University
671Publications
133H-index
88.9kCitations
Publications 662
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#1Roy F. Baurneister (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 133
#2Bradley R. E. Wright (UConn: University of Connecticut)H-Index: 18
Last.David M. Carreon (Stanford University)H-Index: 1
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AbstractAn experience sampling study with a large community sample (N = 3327) furnished data on trait and state self-control in everyday life. State measures were self-reports of ego-depleting even...
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#1Hallgeir Sjåstad (NHH: Norwegian School of Economics)H-Index: 2
#2Roy F. Baurneister (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 133
When, if ever, would a person want to be held responsible for his or her choices? Across four studies (N = 915), people favored more extreme rewards and punishments for their future than their past actions. This included thinking that they should receive more blame and punishment for future misdeeds than for past ones, and more credit and reward for future good deeds than for past ones. The tendency to moralize the future more than the past was mediated by anticipating (one’s own) emotional reac...
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#1Michael J. MacKenzie (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 4
#2Roy F. Baurneister (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 133
Three studies examined effects of social exclusion on reactions to receiving an unexpected gift. Trait Psychological Entitlement was also measured as a potential moderator in all studies. In Study 1, participants wrote about a time they felt rejected, accepted, or something neutral. Compared to the control condition, social exclusion increased self-reported gratitude and observer-rated gratitude. These effects were found among people scoring low on narcissistic entitlement. For these participant...
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#1Carolin Baur (JU: Jacobs University Bremen)
#2Roman Soucek (FAU: University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)H-Index: 3
Last.Roy F. Baurneister (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 133
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Previous research indicates that the depletion of self-regulatory resources can promote unethical behavior that benefits the self. Extending this literature, we focus on norm-transgressing behavior that is intended to primarily benefit others. In particular, we predicted a differing effect of self-regulatory resource depletion on dishonesty that benefits one’s group, depending on the degree of identification with the group. Following a dual process approach, we argue that if identification with ...
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#1Roy F. Baurneister (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 133
Research on authenticity frequently invokes notions of true self, but is there such thing? The question must be answered twice, given frequent confusion and conflation of self with self-concept. Su...
2 CitationsSource
#1Cory J. Clark (Durham University)H-Index: 6
#2Bo M. Winegard (Marietta College)H-Index: 1
Last.Roy F. Baurneister (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 133
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For years, experimental philosophers have attempted to discern whether laypeople find free will compatible with a scientifically deterministic understanding of the universe, yet no consensus has emerged. The present work provides one potential explanation for these discrepant findings: People are strongly motivated to preserve free will and moral responsibility, and thus do not have stable, logically rigorous notions of free will. Seven studies support this hypothesis by demonstrating that a var...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jill Lobbestael (UM: Maastricht University)H-Index: 24
#2Martijn van Teffelen (UM: Maastricht University)
Last.Roy F. Baurneister (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 133
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Background and objectives: Sadistic pleasure — the enjoyment of harm-infliction to others — can have devastating interpersonal and societal consequences. The current knowledge on non-sexual, subclinical forms of sadistic pleasure is poor. The present study therefore focussed on the personality correlates of sadistic pleasure and investigated the relationship between the different subcomponents of psychopathy and both dispositional and state-level sadistic pleasure. Method: N = 120 males drawn fr...
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#1Roy F. BaurneisterH-Index: 133
#2Jessica A. MaxwellH-Index: 5
Last.Kathleen D. VohsH-Index: 66
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Many people describe the time of being newly in love as one of life’s peak experiences. Years later, almost half of them people divorce after thinking they were to be married for life. How did they make such a grievous mistake? Traditional theory assumes that lovers are biased in judgments about their partners. This chapter suggests that evolution has shaped people to form lasting alliances, not just by overvaluing their partners, but also in becoming more lovable themselves. During passionate l...
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#1Joseph P. ForgasH-Index: 56
#2Roy F. BaurneisterH-Index: 133
Gullibility, whether we like it or not, is a fundamental characteristic of human beings. In The Social Psychology of Gullibility, Forgas and Baumeister explore what we know about the causes, functions, and consequences of gullibility, and the social psychological processes that promote or inhibit it. With contributions from leading international researchers, the book reveals what social and cognitive psychology contribute to our understanding of how human judgments and decisions can be distorted...
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#1Joseph P. ForgasH-Index: 56
#2Roy F. BaurneisterH-Index: 133
Gullibility seems to be a fundamental characteristic of human beings. Although the ability to share information with others is one the major evolutionary achievements of our species, this symbolic ability can also be a major source of gullibility. Understanding the processes that lead to gullibility is of growing importance in public life. This introductory chapter will discuss the nature, functions, and social and cultural history of human gullibility. In particular, the evolutionary significan...
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