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Scott H. Fraundorf
University of Pittsburgh
27Publications
9H-index
300Citations
Publications 27
Newest
Published on Jul 3, 2019in Language, cognition and neuroscience 2.09
Lin Chen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Pittsburgh),
Charles A. Perfetti73
Estimated H-index: 73
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 2 AuthorsScott H. Fraundorf9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Pittsburgh)
ABSTRACTHow do skilled Chinese readers, accustomed to characters, process Pinyin, a phonemic transcription of Chinese? Does the orthography of Chinese characters become activated? In four experiments, native speakers first made a meaning judgment on a two-syllable word written in Pinyin. Immediately following, they responded to a character whose orthography sometimes was related to the character corresponding to the Pinyin. In Experiments 1 and 3, participant named the colour of the presented ch...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 18, 2019in Memory & Cognition 1.91
Caitlin A. Rice1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Pittsburgh),
Natasha Tokowicz17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 1 AuthorsTeljer L. Liburd1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Pittsburgh)
In this study we examined the interactions of context availability, polysemy, word frequency, and orthographic neighborhood variables during lexical processing. Context availability and polysemy interacted, in that words that were both lower in context availability and had fewer related senses were especially disadvantaged, as was originally reported by Tokowicz and Kroll (2007). Word frequency interacted with both polysemy and context availability, in that the effects of polysemy and context av...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Psychological Bulletin 13.25
Scott H. Fraundorf9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Pittsburgh),
Kathleen L. Hourihan9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Memorial University of Newfoundland)
+ 1 AuthorsAaron S. Benjamin25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Applied Psycholinguistics 1.84
Eun-Kyung Lee18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Scott H. Fraundorf9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Pittsburgh)
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Published on Oct 1, 2018in Journal of Memory and Language 2.83
Ariel James2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Scott H. Fraundorf9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 1 AuthorsDuane G. Watson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Vanderbilt University)
Abstract There remains little consensus about whether there exist meaningful individual differences in syntactic processing and, if so, what explains them. We argue that this partially reflects the fact that few psycholinguistic studies of individual differences include multiple constructs, multiple measures per construct, or tests for reliable measures. Here, we replicated three major syntactic phenomena in the psycholinguistic literature: use of verb distributional statistics, difficulty of ob...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 2.71
Eun-Kyung Lee18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Yonsei University),
Scott H. Fraundorf9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Pittsburgh)
Contrastive pitch accents benefit native English speakers’ memory for discourse by enhancing a representation of a specific relevant contrast item (Fraundorf et al., 2010). This study examines whether and how second language (L2) listeners differ in how contrastive accents affect their encoding and representation of a discourse, as compared to native speakers. Using the same materials as Fraundorf et al. (2010), we found that low and mid proficiency L2 learners showed no memory benefit from cont...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Journal of Memory and Language 2.83
Jonathan G. Tullis10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Arizona),
Scott H. Fraundorf9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Pittsburgh)
Abstract Successful teaching, effective advertising, and happy interpersonal relationships depend upon accurately anticipating what others will remember. Across three experiments, we tested how precisely subjects judged the mnemonic effectiveness of cues for supporting other subjects’ episodic memories. Some subjects generated cue-target word pairs and made judgments of learning (JOLs) for these word pairs while other subjects studied the pairs and made JOLs. Across all three experiments, subjec...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Memory & Cognition 1.91
Kathleen L. Hourihan9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Memorial University of Newfoundland),
Scott H. Fraundorf9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Pittsburgh),
Aaron S. Benjamin25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
Much is known about how the emotional content of words affects memory for those words, but only recently have researchers begun to investigate whether emotional content influences metamemory—that is, learners’ assessments of what is or is not memorable. The present study replicated recent work demonstrating that judgments of learning (JOLs) do indeed reflect the superior memorability of words with emotional content. We further contrasted two hypotheses regarding this effect: a physiological acco...
5 Citations Source Cite
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