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Gordon Pennycook
University of Regina
Cognitive stylePsychologyCognitionCognitive psychologySocial psychology
87Publications
30H-index
2,844Citations
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Publications 87
Newest
#1Ben M. Tappin (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 5
#2Gordon Pennycook (University of Regina)H-Index: 30
Last. David G. Rand (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 49
view all 3 authors...
Abstract A surprising finding from U.S. opinion surveys is that political disagreements tend to be greatest among the most cognitively sophisticated opposing partisans. Recent experiments suggest a hypothesis that could explain this pattern: cognitive sophistication magnifies politically biased processing of new information. However, the designs of these experiments tend to contain several limitations that complicate their support for this hypothesis. In particular, they tend to (i) focus on peo...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ben M. Tappin (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 5
#2Gordon Pennycook (University of Regina)H-Index: 30
Last. David G. Rand (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 49
view all 3 authors...
A common inference in behavioral science is that people’s motivation to reach a politically congenial conclusion causally affects their reasoning—known as politically motivated reasoning. Often these inferences are made on the basis of data from randomized experiments that use one of two paradigmatic designs: Outcome Switching, in which identical methods are described as reaching politically congenial versus uncongenial conclusions; or Party Cues, in which identical information is described as b...
3 CitationsSource
#1Michael V. Bronstein (Yale University)H-Index: 4
#2Gordon Pennycook (University of Regina)H-Index: 30
Last. Tyrone D. Cannon (Yale University)H-Index: 93
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1J.J. van BavelH-Index: 1
#1Jay J. Van Bavel (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 31
Last. J.N. DruckmanH-Index: 1
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The COVID-19 pandemic represents a massive, global health crisis. Because the crisis requires large-scale behavior change and poses significant psychological burdens on individuals, insights from the social and behavioural sciences are critical for optimizing pandemic response. Here we review relevant research from a diversity of research areas relevant to different dimensions of pandemic response. We review foundational work on navigating threats, social and cultural factors, science communicat...
54 CitationsSource
Apr 21, 2020 in CHI (Human Factors in Computing Systems)
#1Ziv Epstein (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 4
#2Gordon Pennycook (University of Regina)H-Index: 30
Last. David G. Rand (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 49
view all 3 authors...
3 CitationsSource
#1Gordon PennycookH-Index: 30
#2Jonathon McPhetresH-Index: 1
Last. David G. RandH-Index: 49
view all 4 authors...
1 Citations
#1Gordon Pennycook (University of Regina)H-Index: 30
#2David G. Rand (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 49
Objective: Fake news represents a particularly egregious and direct avenue by which inaccurate beliefs have been propagated via social media. We investigate the psychological profile of individuals who fall prey to fake news. Method: We recruited 1,606 participants from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk for three online surveys. Results: The tendency to ascribe profundity to randomly generated sentences – pseudo-profound bullshit receptivity – correlates positively with perceptions of fake news accuracy,...
54 CitationsSource
#1Gordon PennycookH-Index: 30
#2Jonathon McPhetresH-Index: 1
Last. David G. RandH-Index: 49
view all 3 authors...
5 Citations
#1Gordon Pennycook (University of Regina)H-Index: 30
Source
#1Gordon Pennycook (University of Regina)H-Index: 30
#2Adam Bear (Harvard University)H-Index: 8
Last. David G. Rand (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 49
view all 4 authors...
What are effective techniques for combating belief in fake news? Tagging fake articles with “Disputed by 3rd party fact-checkers” warnings and making articles’ sources more salient by adding publisher logos are two approaches that have received large-scale rollouts on social media in recent months. Here we assess the effect of these interventions on perceptions of accuracy across seven experiments (total N=7,534). With respect to disputed warnings, we find that tagging articles as disputed did s...
31 CitationsSource
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