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Jonathon W. Sensinger
University of New Brunswick
29Publications
10H-index
324Citations
Publications 29
Newest
Last.Jonathon W. Sensinger (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 11
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#1Leonard F. Engels (Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies)H-Index: 1
#2Ahmed W. Shehata (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 2
Last.Christian Cipriani (Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies)H-Index: 28
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State of the art myoelectric hand prostheses can restore some feedforward motor function to their users, but they cannot yet restore sensory feedback. It has been shown, using psychophysical tests, that multi-modal sensory feedback is readily used in the formation of the users’ representation of the control task in their central nervous system—their internal model. Hence, to fully describe the effect of providing feedback to prosthesis users, not only should functional outcomes be assessed, but ...
#1Daniel Blustein (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 3
#2Ahmed W. Shehata (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 2
Last.Jonathon W. Sensinger (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 2
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Research on human motor adaptation has often focused on how people adapt to self-generated or externally-influenced errors. Trial-by-trial adaptation is a person’s response to self-generated errors. Externally-influenced errors applied as catch-trial perturbations are used to calculate a person’s perturbation adaptation rate. Although these adaptation rates are sometimes compared to one another, we show through simulation and empirical data that the two metrics are distinct. We demonstrate that ...
#1Ahmed W. Shehata (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 2
#2Leonard F. Engels (Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies)H-Index: 1
Last.Jonathon W. Sensinger (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 2
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Background The loss of an arm presents a substantial challenge for upper limb amputees when performing activities of daily living. Myoelectric prosthetic devices partially replace lost hand functions; however, lack of sensory feedback and strong understanding of the myoelectric control system prevent prosthesis users from interacting with their environment effectively. Although most research in augmented sensory feedback has focused on real-time regulation, sensory feedback is also essential for...
#1Ahmed W. Shehata (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 2
#2Erik Scheme (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 10
Last.Jonathon W. Sensinger (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 2
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Myoelectric prosthetic devices are commonly used to help upper limb amputees perform activities of daily living, however amputees still lack the sensory feedback required to facilitate reliable and precise control. Augmented feedback may play an important role in affecting both short-term performance, through real-time regulation, and long-term performance, through the development of stronger internal models. In this work, we investigate the potential tradeoff between controllers that enable bet...
#1Ahmed W. Shehata (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 2
#2Erik Scheme (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 10
Last.Jonathon W. Sensinger (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 10
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On-going developments in myoelectric prosthesis control have provided prosthesis users with an assortment of control strategies that vary in reliability and performance. Many studies have focused on improving performance by providing feedback to the user but have overlooked the effect of this feedback on internal model development, which is key to improve long-term performance. In this paper, the strength of internal models developed for two commonly used myoelectric control strategies: raw cont...
#1Ahmed W. Shehata (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 2
#2Erik Scheme (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 10
Last.Jonathon W. Sensinger (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 10
view all 3 authors...
Myoelectric prosthetic devices are commonly used to help upper limb amputees perform activities of daily living, however amputees still lack the sensory feedback required to facilitate reliable and precise control. Augmented feedback may play an important role in affecting both short-term performance, through real-time regulation, and long-term performance, through the development of stronger internal models. In this work, we investigate the potential tradeoff between controllers that enable bet...
#1Daniel Blustein (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 3
#2Jonathon W. Sensinger (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 10
Current motor assessment tools can provide numerical indicators of performance but do not provide actionable information to target further improvement in rehabilitation interventions. Psychophysics-based outcome measures show promise to provide more useful information in the laboratory environment but have been limited in clinical implementation. Here we present a constrained-time task to assess paced and non-rhythmic movements. The task's output metrics include trial-by-trial adaptation rate an...
#1Ahmed W. Shehata (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 2
#2Erik Scheme (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 10
Last.Jonathon W. Sensinger (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 2
view all 3 authors...
The long-term performance of myoelectric prostheses is related not only to the short-term performance of the controller, but also to the user's ability to learn and adapt to the system. Different control architectures may have inherent tradeoffs between their short-term performance and the amount of relevant feedback that informs this adaptation. In this study we focused on the ability of two common types of myoelectric control interfaces: raw control with raw feedback, such as a regression, and...
#1Reva E. Johnson (Valpo: Valparaiso University)H-Index: 4
#2Konrad Paul Kording (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 42
Last.Jonathon W. Sensinger (UNB: University of New Brunswick)H-Index: 10
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In this paper we asked the question: if we artificially raise the variability of torque control signals to match that of EMG, do subjects make similar errors and have similar uncertainty about their movements? We answered this question using two experiments in which subjects used three different control signals: torque, torque+noise, and EMG. First, we measured error on a simple target-hitting task in which subjects received visual feedback only at the end of their movements. We found that even ...
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