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Glenn Firebaugh
Pennsylvania State University
90Publications
30H-index
4,133Citations
Publications 90
Newest
#1Francesco Acciai (ASU: Arizona State University)
#2Glenn Firebaugh (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 30
Abstract The submitted manuscript is an original investigation of the U.S. mortality pattern from 2000 to 2017. Previous research has shown that the unusual post-2014 decline in life expectancy is related to the increase in death rates for ages 25–44, mostly due to rising prevalence in drug poisoning and suicide deaths. Our investigation reveals that such increase in younger-age mortality has had an impact not only on life expectancy (or mean age at death), but also, and to a larger extent, on l...
#1Jeffrey D. Horbar (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 43
#2Erika M. Edwards (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 20
Last.Glenn Firebaugh (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 30
view all 12 authors...
Importance Racial and ethnic minorities receive lower-quality health care than white non-Hispanic individuals in the United States. Where minority infants receive care and the role that may play in the quality of care received is unclear. Objective To determine the extent of segregation and inequality of care of very low-birth-weight and very preterm infants across neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the United States. Design, Setting, and Participants This cohort study of 743 NICUs in the ...
#1Francesco Acciai (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 6
#2Glenn Firebaugh (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 30
In 2015, age-adjusted mortality rates increased for 8 of the 10 leading causes of death in the United States. As a result, life expectancy declined by 0.17 years for both women and men. The decline could be just an anomaly, or it could represent the start of a new trend of stagnation or decline in life expectancy, as some scholars have warned. The first step is to determine the sources of the decline. In this study we analyze the contribution of specific causes of death to the decline in men's v...
#1Glenn Firebaugh (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 30
#2Francesco Acciai (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 6
Abstract Black residential segregation has been declining in the United States. That accomplishment rings hollow, however, if blacks continue to live in much poorer neighborhoods than other Americans. This study uses census data for all US metropolitan areas in 1980 and 2010 to compare decline in the neighborhood poverty gap between blacks and other Americans with decline in the residential segregation of blacks. We find that both declines resulted primarily from narrowing differences between bl...
#1Aggie J. NoahH-Index: 6
#2Francesco Acciai (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 6
Last.Glenn Firebaugh (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 30
view all 3 authors...
(ProQuest: ... denotes formulae omitted.)1.IntroductionSuicide - intentional death resulting from a victim's own action - is the product of a complex interplay between individuals and society (Durkheim 1952). Since the mid1990s, South Korea (hereafter Korea) has experienced an unprecedented increase in suicide, and currently has the third highest suicide rate in the world, after Guyana (44.2 per 100,000) and North Korea (38.5 per 100,000) (World Health Organization 2014). In 2010, Korea had both...
#1Chad R. Farrell (UAA: University of Alaska Anchorage)H-Index: 10
#2Glenn Firebaugh (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 30
Abstract We investigate suburbanization and neighborhood inequality among 14 immigrant groups using census tract data from the 2008–2012 American Community Survey. Immigrant neighborhood inequality is defined here as the degree to which immigrants reside in neighborhoods that are poorer than the neighborhoods in which native whites reside. Using city and suburb Gini coefficients which reflect the distributions of groups across neighborhoods with varying poverty rates, we find that the immigrant-...
#1Glenn Firebaugh (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 30
#2Chad R. Farrell (UAA: University of Alaska Anchorage)H-Index: 10
Although residential segregation is known to have declined for some racial groups in America, much less is known about change in the relative socioeconomic quality of the neighborhoods where different racial and ethnic groups live. Using census data for 1980–2010, we find that the neighborhoods where whites and minorities reside have become more alike in terms of neighborhood poverty and median income, largely because whites now live in poorer neighborhoods and because African Americans live in ...
#1Joseph T. Lariscy (U of M: University of Memphis)H-Index: 6
#2Claudia Nau (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 9
Last.Robert A. Hummer (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 47
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Abstract This study is the first to investigate whether and, if so, why Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites in the United States differ in the variability of their lifespans. Although Hispanics enjoy higher life expectancy than whites, very little is known about how lifespan variability—and thus uncertainty about length of life—differs by race/ethnicity. We use 2010 U.S. National Vital Statistics System data to calculate lifespan variance at ages 10+ for Hispanics and whites, and then decompose th...
#1Francesco Acciai (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 6
#2Aggie J. Noah (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 6
Last.Glenn Firebaugh (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 30
view all 3 authors...
Background Asian–Americans outlive whites by an average of nearly 8 years. By determining the sources of the Asian mortality advantage, we can pinpoint where there is the greatest potential for raising the life expectancy of whites and other groups in the USA. Methods Our analyses include all Asian and white deaths in the USA between 2006 and 2010, from the Center for Disease Control. Using the International Classification of Diseases (V.10), we code causes of deaths into 19 categories, based on...
We show how to extend Lorenz curves and the Gini index to depict inequality and segregation for more than two groups. To illustrate our methods, we use U.S. census data for 1980 and 2010 to investigate both change in racial neighborhood segregation (the uneven distribution of racial groups across neighborhoods) and change in racial neighborhood inequality (the uneven distribution of racial groups across rich and poor neighborhoods). We include all metropolitan areas in the United States, thus ca...
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