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Helene C. Muller-Landau
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Seed dispersalEcologyBiological dispersalBotanyBiology
124Publications
51H-index
11.8kCitations
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Publications 126
Newest
#1Stephen P. Yanoviak (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 26
#2Evan M. Gora (University of Louisville)H-Index: 3
Last. Stephen P. Hubbell (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 85
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The mortality rates of large trees are critical to determining carbon stocks in tropical forests, but the mechanisms of tropical tree mortality remain poorly understood. Lightning strikes thousands of tropical trees every day, but is commonly assumed to be a minor agent of tree mortality in most tropical forests. We use the first systematic quantification of lightning-caused mortality to show that lightning is a major cause of death for the largest trees in an old-growth lowland forest in Panama...
Source
#1Ervan Rutishauser (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 19
#2S. Joseph Wright (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 76
Last. Helene C. Muller-Landau (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 51
view all 6 authors...
Source
#1Charles D. Koven (LBNL: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)H-Index: 38
#2Ryan G. Knox (LBNL: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)H-Index: 11
Last. Chonggang Xu (LANL: Los Alamos National Laboratory)H-Index: 26
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Abstract. Plant functional traits determine vegetation responses to environmental variation, but variation in trait values is large, even within a single site. Likewise, uncertainty in how these traits map to Earth system feedbacks is large. We use a vegetation demographic model (VDM), the Functionally Assembled Terrestrial Ecosystem Simulator (FATES), to explore parameter sensitivity of model predictions, and comparison to observations, at a tropical forest site: Barro Colorado Island in Panama...
1 CitationsSource
#1M.J.E. Broekman (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 1
#2Helene C. Muller-Landau (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 51
Last. Hans de Kroon (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 46
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1 CitationsSource
Source
#1Helene C. Muller-Landau (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 51
#2Marco D. Visser (Princeton University)H-Index: 8
Lianas and other climbing plants are structural parasites of trees, generally reducing host tree survival, growth, and reproduction, yet their influences on the outcome of competition among tree species have remained largely unexplored. We propose that there are three distinct components to liana–tree interactions: prevalence, defined as the proportion of infested trees; load, defined as the mean liana cover on infested trees; and tolerance, defined as the effect of a given level of infestation ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Isabel Martinez Cano (Princeton University)H-Index: 1
#2Helene C. Muller-Landau (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 51
Last. Stephen W. Pacala (Princeton University)H-Index: 77
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Abstract. Tree allometric relationships are widely employed for estimating forest biomass and production and are basic building blocks of dynamic vegetation models. In tropical forests, allometric relationships are often modeled by fitting scale-invariant power functions to pooled data from multiple species, an approach that fails to capture changes in scaling during ontogeny and physical limits to maximum tree size and that ignores interspecific differences in allometry. Here, we analyzed allom...
3 CitationsSource
#1Evan M. Gora (University of Louisville)H-Index: 3
#2Riley C. Kneale (University of Louisville)H-Index: 2
Last. Helene C. Muller-Landau (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 51
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Woody debris (WD) stocks and fluxes are important components of forest carbon budgets and yet remain understudied, particularly in tropical forests. Here we present the most comprehensive assessment of WD stocks and fluxes yet conducted in a tropical forest, including one of the first tropical estimates of suspended WD. We rely on data collected over 8 years in an old-growth moist tropical forest in Panama to quantify spatiotemporal variability and estimate minimum sample sizes for different com...
6 CitationsSource
#1S. Joseph Wright (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 76
#2Osvaldo Calderón (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 12
Last. Helene C. Muller-Landau (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 51
view all 3 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Marco D. Visser (Princeton University)H-Index: 8
#2Helene C. Muller-Landau (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 51
Last. S. Joseph Wright (STRI: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute)H-Index: 76
view all 6 authors...
The datasets were collected with funding from the National Science Foundation (DEB 0453445; 0453665; 0613666, 0845071, 1019436 & 1558093), Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO-ALW 801-01-009), the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, the Centre for Tropical Forest Science, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Mellon Foundation and the Small World Institute Fund.
4 CitationsSource
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