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Sam Heft-Neal
Stanford University
14Publications
6H-index
112Citations
Publications 15
Newest
#2Peter R. Colarco (GSFC: Goddard Space Flight Center)H-Index: 25
Last.Sam Heft-Neal (Stanford University)H-Index: 6
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#1Zachary Wagner (AN: RAND Corporation)H-Index: 8
#2Sam Heft-Neal (Stanford University)H-Index: 6
Last.Eran Bendavid (Stanford University)H-Index: 28
view all 8 authors...
Summary Background The population effects of armed conflict on non-combatant vulnerable populations are incompletely understood. We aimed to study the effects of conflict on mortality among women of childbearing age (15–49 years) and on orphanhood among children younger than 15 years in Africa. Methods We tested the extent to which mortality among women aged 15–49 years, and orphanhood among children younger than 15 years, increased in response to nearby armed conflict in Africa. Data on locatio...
1 CitationsSource
#1Nathan C. Lo (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 10
#2Nathan C Lo (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 1
Last.David G. AddissH-Index: 45
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Summary Background Mass deworming against soil-transmitted helminthiasis, which affects 1 billion of the poorest people globally, is one of the largest public health programmes for neglected tropical diseases, and is intended to be equitable. However, the extent to which treatment programmes for deworming achieve equitable coverage across wealth class and sex is unclear and the public health metric of national deworming coverage does not include representation of equity. This study aims to measu...
1 CitationsSource
#1Corey J. A. Bradshaw (Flinders University)H-Index: 59
#2Sarah P. Otto (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 61
Last.P. N. Le Souëf (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 49
view all 7 authors...
Objective We sought to test hypotheses regarding the principal correlates of child-health performance among African nations based on previous evidence collected at finer spatial scales. Design Retrospective, cross-sectional study. Setting All countries in Africa, excluding small-island nations. Primary and secondary outcome measures We defined a composite child-health indicator for each country comprising the incidence of stunting, deaths from respiratory disease, deaths from diarrhoeal disease,...
Source
#1Sam Heft-NealH-Index: 6
#2Jennifer BurneyH-Index: 11
Last.Marshall BurkeH-Index: 28
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1Nathan C. Lo (Stanford University)H-Index: 10
#2Sam Heft-Neal (Stanford University)H-Index: 6
Last.David G. AddissH-Index: 45
view all 6 authors...
Introduction: Mass deworming against soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH) is a hallmark program in the neglected tropical diseases portfolio that is designed to be equitable and pro-poor. However, the extent to which current deworming treatment programs achieve equitable coverage across wealth class and gender remains unclear, and the current public health metric of national deworming coverage does not include representation of inequity. This study develops a framework to measure both coverage a...
Source
#1Zachary Wagner (Stanford University)H-Index: 8
#2Sam Heft-Neal (Stanford University)H-Index: 6
Last.Eran Bendavid (Stanford University)H-Index: 28
view all 6 authors...
Source
#1Zachary Wagner (Stanford University)H-Index: 8
#2Sam Heft-Neal (Stanford University)H-Index: 6
Last.Eran Bendavid (Stanford University)H-Index: 28
view all 6 authors...
Summary Background A substantial portion of child deaths in Africa take place in countries with recent history of armed conflict and political instability. However, the extent to which armed conflict is an important cause of child mortality, especially in Africa, remains unknown. Methods We matched child survival with proximity to armed conflict using information in the Uppsala Conflict Data Program Georeferenced Events Dataset on the location and intensity of armed conflict from 1995 to 2015 to...
13 CitationsSource
#1Marshall Burke (Stanford University)H-Index: 28
#2Felipe González (UC: Pontifical Catholic University of Chile)H-Index: 4
Last.Solomon M. Hsiang (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 18
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Linkages between climate and mental health are often theorized but remain poorly quantified. In particular, it is unknown whether the rate of suicide, a leading cause of death globally, is systematically affected by climatic conditions. Using comprehensive data from multiple decades for both the United States and Mexico, we find that suicide rates rise 0.7% in US counties and 2.1% in Mexican municipalities for a 1 °C increase in monthly average temperature. This effect is similar in hotter versu...
20 CitationsSource
#1Sam Heft-Neal (Stanford University)H-Index: 6
#2Jennifer Burney (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 11
Last.Marshall Burke (Stanford University)H-Index: 28
view all 4 authors...
Poor air quality is thought to be an important mortality risk factor globally1–3, but there is little direct evidence from the developing world on how mortality risk varies with changing exposure to ambient particulate matter. Current global estimates apply exposure–response relationships that have been derived mostly from wealthy, mid-latitude countries to spatial population data 4 , and these estimates remain unvalidated across large portions of the globe. Here we combine household survey-base...
28 CitationsSource
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