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Nobuhiro Hagura
University College London
PsychologyNeuroscienceVisual perceptionPerceptionSensory system
14Publications
8H-index
474Citations
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Publications 24
Newest
#1Nobuhiro Hagura (Osaka University)H-Index: 1
#2Kazuma Aoyama (UTokyo: University of Tokyo)H-Index: 1
Last. Elisa Raffaella Ferrè (Osaka University)H-Index: 17
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Source
#1Andrea DesantisH-Index: 10
#2Patrick Haggard (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 82
Last. Nobuhiro HaguraH-Index: 8
view all 4 authors...
The perceived temporal order of actions and changes in the environment is crucial for our inferences of causality. Sensory events presented shortly after an action are more likely considered as self-generated compared to the same events occurring before action execution. However, the estimation of when an action or a sensory change occurred is a challenge for the human brain. This estimation is formed from available sensory information combined with internal representations. Researchers suggeste...
1 CitationsSource
#1Nobuhiro HaguraH-Index: 8
#2Patrick HaggardH-Index: 82
Last. Jörn DiedrichsenH-Index: 46
view all 3 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Nobuhiro Hagura (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 8
#2Patrick Haggard (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 82
Last. Jörn Diedrichsen (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 46
view all 3 authors...
Imagine you are in an orchard, trying to decide which of the many apples to pick. On what do you base your decision? Most research into this type of decision-making has focused on how the brain uses visual information – about features such as colour, size and shape – to make a choice. But what about the effort required to obtain the apple? Does an apple at the top of the tree look more or less tempting than the low-hanging fruit? To answer this kind of question, Hagura et al. asked volunteers to...
21 CitationsSource
#1Scinob Kuroki (NTT: Nippon Telegraph and Telephone)H-Index: 4
#2Nobuhiro Hagura (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 8
Last. Junji Watanabe (NTT: Nippon Telegraph and Telephone)H-Index: 40
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An Asian spice, Szechuan pepper (sanshool), is well known for the tingling sensation it induces on the mouth and on the lips. Electrophysiological studies have revealed that its active ingredient can induce firing of mechanoreceptor fibres that typically respond to mechanical vibration. Moreover, a human behavioral study has reported that the perceived frequency of sanshool-induced tingling matches with the preferred frequency range of the tactile rapidly adapting (RA) channel, suggesting the co...
2 CitationsSource
#1Kenta Funayama (UTokyo: University of Tokyo)H-Index: 4
#2Nobuhiro Hagura (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology)H-Index: 1
Last. Yuji Ikegaya (UTokyo: University of Tokyo)H-Index: 45
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The primary visual cortex exhibits a late, long response with a latency of >300 ms and an immediate early response that occurs ∼100 ms after a visual stimulus. The late response is thought to contribute to visual functions such as sensory perception, iconic memory, working memory, and forming connections between temporally separated stimuli. However, how the visual late response is generated and organized is not completely understood. In the mouse primary visual cortex in vivo , we isolated long...
3 CitationsSource
#1Nobuhiro Hagura (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 8
#2Patrick Haggard (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 82
Last. Jörn Diedrichsen (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 46
view all 3 authors...
Source
#1Guido Orgs (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 12
#2Anna DovernH-Index: 7
Last. Peter H. WeissH-Index: 41
view all 6 authors...
The human brain readily perceives fluent movement from static input. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated brain mechanisms that mediate fluent apparent biological motion (ABM) perception from sequences of body postures. We presented body and nonbody stimuli varying in objective sequence duration and fluency of apparent movement. Three body postures were ordered to produce a fluent (ABC) or a nonfluent (ACB) apparent movement. This enabled us to identify brain areas involv...
11 CitationsSource
#1Isao Nambu (Nagaoka University of Technology)H-Index: 7
#2Nobuhiro Hagura (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 8
Last. Eiichi Naito (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology)H-Index: 7
view all 6 authors...
Performing a complex sequential finger movement requires the temporally well-ordered organization of individual finger movements. Previous behavioural studies have suggested that the brain prepares a whole sequence of movements as a single set, rather than the movements of individual fingers. However, direct neuroimaging support for this hypothesis is lacking and, assuming it to be true, it remains unclear which brain regions represent the information of a prepared sequence. Here, we measured br...
11 CitationsSource
#1Nobuhiro Hagura (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 8
#2Patrick Haggard (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 82
Neuroprosthetics refer to prosthetic devices designed according to neuroscientific principles and interfacing directly with the nervous system. We propose a fundamental distinction between receptor prosthetics and somatic prosthetics. Receptor prosthetics involve substituting or augmenting the signals that the peripheral end-organ sends to the brain. In the ideal case, this substitution is perfectly transparent, so no novel learning or plastic change of neural processing is required. In contrast...
1 CitationsSource
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