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Sebastian Amsuess
University of Göttingen
15Publications
7H-index
127Citations
Publications 15
Newest
#1Theresa RolandH-Index: 1
Last.Werner BaumgartnerH-Index: 33
view all 5 authors...
Electromyography (EMG), the measurement of electrical muscle activity, is used in a variety of applications, including myoelectric upper-limb prostheses, which help amputees to regain independence and a higher quality of life. The state-of-the-art sensors in prostheses have a conductive connection to the skin and are therefore sensitive to sweat and require preparation of the skin. They are applied with some pressure to ensure a conductive connection, which may result in pressure marks and can b...
#1Theresa RolandH-Index: 1
#2Sebastian AmsuessH-Index: 7
Last.Werner BaumgartnerH-Index: 33
view all 4 authors...
Myoelectric prostheses help amputees to regain independence and a higher quality of life. These prostheses are controlled by state-of-the-art electromyography sensors, which use a conductive connection to the skin and are therefore sensitive to sweat. They are applied with some pressure to ensure a conductive connection, which may result in pressure marks and can be problematic for patients with circulatory disorders, who constitute a major group of amputees. Here, we present ultra-low-power dig...
#1Theresa Roland (Johannes Kepler University of Linz)H-Index: 1
#2Sabrina Mairhofer (Johannes Kepler University of Linz)H-Index: 1
Last.Werner Baumgartner (Johannes Kepler University of Linz)H-Index: 33
view all 8 authors...
Myoelectric prostheses use electromyography (EMG) signals to control the movements of the prosthesis. EMG-signals are electric potentials on the skin which originate from voluntarily contracted muscles within a person’s residual limb. Thus prostheses of this type utilize the residual neuro-muscular system of the human body to control the functions of an electrically powered prosthesis. Standard measurements are done using conductive electrodes on the skin surface. For technical reasons a capacit...
Jul 1, 2017 in EMBC (International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society)
#1Theresa Roland (Johannes Kepler University of Linz)H-Index: 1
#2Werner Baumgartner (Johannes Kepler University of Linz)H-Index: 33
view all 4 authors...
As motion artefacts are a major problem with electromyography sensors, a new algorithm is developed to differentiate artefacts to contraction EMG. The performance of myoelectric prosthesis is increased with this algorithm. The implementation is done for an ultra-low-power microcontroller with limited calculation resources and memory. Short Time Fourier Transformation is used to enable real-time application. The sum of the differences (SOD) of the currently measured EMG to a reference contraction...
#1Ivan Vujaklija (Imperial College London)H-Index: 9
#2Aidan D. Roche (Medical University of Vienna)H-Index: 9
Last.Oskar C. Aszmann (Medical University of Vienna)H-Index: 24
view all 7 authors...
Missing an upper limb dramatically impairs daily-life activities. Efforts in overcoming the issues arising from this disability have been made in both academia and industry, although their clinical outcome is still limited. Translation of prosthetic research into clinics has been challenging because of the difficulties in meeting the necessary requirements of the market. In this perspective, we suggest that one relevant factor determining the relatively small clinical impact of myocontrol algori...
#1Silvia Muceli (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 18
#2Ivan Vujaklija (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 9
Last.Dario Farina (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 70
view all 7 authors...
We review recent studies that aimed at designing an intuitive and robust myoelectric control system for transradial amputees. The methods developed assume that the forearm muscles are controlled in a synergistic manner and capture this synergistic structure hidden in the electromyographic signal patterns by factorization algorithms. We have shown that this system is capable of providing robust control over multiple degrees of freedom relying on 6 electrodes only and that it is robust to electrod...
#1Ivan Vujaklija (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 9
#2Sebastian AmsuessH-Index: 7
Last.Oskar C. Aszmann (Medical University of Vienna)H-Index: 24
view all 5 authors...
Research conducted over the last decades indicates a necessity of having larger number of EMG sensors in order to extract sufficient information needed for natural control of upper limb prosthetics. Various studies have addressed this issue, though clinical transition and evaluation of such systems on a larger pool of patients is still missing. We propose a specifically designed system which allows users to perform clinically relevant tests in an unobstructed way while handling dexterous prosthe...
#1Oskar C. AszmannH-Index: 24
#2Ivan VujaklijaH-Index: 9
Last.Sebastian AmsuessH-Index: 7
view all 11 authors...
Elective amputation and bionic substitution restore functional hand use after critical soft tissue injuries
#1Sebastian Amsuess (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 7
#2Ivan Vujaklija (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 9
Last.Dario Farina (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 70
view all 7 authors...
Pattern recognition and regression methods applied to the surface EMG have been used for estimating the user intended motor tasks across multiple degrees of freedom (DOF), for prosthetic control. While these methods are effective in several conditions, they are still characterized by some shortcomings. In this study we propose a methodology that combines these two approaches for mutually alleviating their limitations. This resulted in a control method capable of context-dependent movement estima...
#1Sebastian Amsuess (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 7
#2Peter M. GoebelH-Index: 4
Last.Dario Farina (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 70
view all 4 authors...
Functional replacement of upper limbs by means of dexterous prosthetic devices remains a technological challenge. While the mechanical design of prosthetic hands has advanced rapidly, the human-machine interfacing and the control strategies needed for the activation of multiple degrees of freedom are not reliable enough for restoring hand function successfully. Machine learning methods capable of inferring the user intent from EMG signals generated by the activation of the remnant muscles are re...
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