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Barnabas H. Daru
University of Pretoria
45Publications
13H-index
507Citations
Publications 45
Newest
#1Rabia Mathakutha (University of Pretoria)H-Index: 2
#2C. Steyn (University of Pretoria)H-Index: 2
Last.Michelle Greve (University of Pretoria)H-Index: 11
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#1Barnabas H. Daru (A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi)H-Index: 13
#2Barnabas H. Daru (A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi)H-Index: 1
Last.Michelle Greve (University of Pretoria)H-Index: 11
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#1Barnabas H. Daru (A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi)H-Index: 13
#2Barnabas H. Daru (A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi)H-Index: 1
Last.A.E. van Wyk (University of Pretoria)H-Index: 21
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#1Barnabas H. Daru (A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi)H-Index: 13
#2Barnabas H. Daru (A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi)H-Index: 1
Last.A. Elizabeth Arnold (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 35
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Herbarium specimens represent important records of morphological and genetic diversity of plants that inform questions relevant to global change, including species distributions, phenology and functional traits. It is increasingly appreciated that plant microbiomes can influence these aspects of plant biology, but little is known regarding the historic distribution of microbes associated with plants collected in the pre-molecular age. If microbiomes can be observed reliably in herbarium specimen...
#1Emily K. Meineke (Harvard University)H-Index: 4
#2T. Jonathan Davies (UJ: University of Johannesburg)H-Index: 2
Last.Charles C. Davis (Harvard University)H-Index: 40
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Global change has become a central focus of modern biology. Yet, our knowledge of how anthropogenic drivers affect biodiversity and natural resources is limited by a lack of biological data spanning the Anthropocene. We propose that the hundreds of millions of plant, fungal and animal specimens deposited in natural history museums have the potential to transform the field of global change biology. We suggest that museum specimens are underused, particularly in ecological studies, given their cap...
#1Barnabas H Daru (A&M: Texas A&M University)
#2Matthew M. Kling (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 2
Last.A.E. van Wyk (University of Pretoria)H-Index: 21
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PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Herbarium specimens are increasingly used as records of plant flowering phenology, which has advanced for many species in response to climate change. However, most herbarium-based studies on plant phenology focus on taxa from temperate parts of the northern hemisphere. Here, we explore flowering phenologic responses to climate in a temperate/subtropical plant genus Protea (Proteaceae), an iconic group of woody plants with year-round flowering phenology and endemic to sub-Sa...
#1Barnabas H. Daru (University of Pretoria)H-Index: 13
#2Michelle van der Bank (UJ: University of Johannesburg)H-Index: 19
Last.T. Jonathan Davies (McGill University)H-Index: 12
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The Government of Canada through Genome Canada and Ontario Genomics Institute (2008‐OGI‐ICI‐03), International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and University of Johannesburg.
#1Barnabas H. Daru (Harvard University)H-Index: 13
#2Daniel S. Park (Harvard University)H-Index: 8
Last.Charles C. Davis (Harvard University)H-Index: 40
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Summary Nonrandom collecting practices may bias conclusions drawn from analyses of herbarium records. Recent efforts to fully digitize and mobilize regional floras online offer a timely opportunity to assess commonalities and differences in herbarium sampling biases. We determined spatial, temporal, trait, phylogenetic, and collector biases in c. 5 million herbarium records, representing three of the most complete digitized floras of the world: Australia (AU), South Africa (SA), and New England,...
#1Barnabas H. Daru (University of Pretoria)H-Index: 13
#2Tammy L. Elliott (UdeM: Université de Montréal)H-Index: 1
Last.T. Jonathan Davies (McGill University)H-Index: 9
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A key step in understanding the distribution of biodiversity is the grouping of regions based on their shared elements. Historically, regionalization schemes have been largely species centric. Recently, there has been interest in incorporating phylogenetic information into regionalization schemes. Phylogenetic regionalization can provide novel insights into the mechanisms that generate, distribute, and maintain biodiversity. We argue that four processes (dispersal limitation, extinction, speciat...
#1Barnabas H. Daru (University of Pretoria)H-Index: 13
#2Ben G. Holt (Imperial College London)H-Index: 10
Last.T. Jonathan Davies (McGill University)H-Index: 9
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Abstract While our knowledge of species distributions and diversity in the terrestrial biosphere has increased sharply over the last decades, we lack equivalent knowledge of the marine world. Here, we use the phylogenetic tree of seagrasses along with their global distributions and a metric of phylogenetic beta diversity to generate a phylogenetically-based delimitation of marine phytoregions (phyloregions). We then evaluate their evolutionary affinities and explore environmental correlates of p...
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