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Paul R. Bown
University College London
OceanographyCretaceousCalcareousGeologyPaleontology
247Publications
39H-index
6,338Citations
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Publications 249
Newest
#1Stephen J. Gallagher (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 22
#2Bridget S. Wade (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 27
Last. Tony Allan (CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)H-Index: 3
view all 10 authors...
Abstract Multiple stable isotope investigations from upper Eocene to lower Oligocene deep-water marine sequences record the transition from global greenhouse to the icehouse conditions (Oi-1 glacial). While Southern Ocean high latitude deep sea records of this transition are well known, their shallow marine equivalents are rare and have the potential to record the eustatic and oceanic consequences of Paleogene glacial variability. The well-known high paleolatitude (~55°S) neritic carbonate seque...
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#1Christopher M. Lowery (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 8
#2Paul R. Bown (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 39
Last. Pincelli M. Hull (Yale University)H-Index: 15
view all 4 authors...
Severe climatic and environmental changes are far more prevalent in Earth history than major extinction events, and the relationship between environmental change and extinction severity has importa...
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#1Pincelli M. Hull (Yale University)H-Index: 15
#2André Bornemann (BGR: Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources)H-Index: 20
Last. James C. Zachos (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 76
view all 36 authors...
The cause of the end-Cretaceous mass extinction is vigorously debated, owing to the occurrence of a very large bolide impact and flood basalt volcanism near the boundary. Disentangling their relative importance is complicated by uncertainty regarding kill mechanisms and the relative timing of volcanogenic outgassing, impact, and extinction. We used carbon cycle modeling and paleotemperature records to constrain the timing of volcanogenic outgassing. We found support for major outgassing beginnin...
4 CitationsSource
#1Carlotta Cappelli (UNIPD: University of Padua)
#1Carlotta Cappelli (UNIPD: University of Padua)H-Index: 1
Last. M De Riu (UNIPD: University of Padua)
view all 4 authors...
Abstract A combined light microscope-scanning electron microscope study of exceptionally well-preserved calcareous nannofossil assemblages from clay-rich middle Eocene sediments recovered at IODP Site U1410 (NW Atlantic Ocean) has enabled us to document a new evolutionary lineage within Coccolithus-like placoliths that have well-developed near-axial or diagonal cross-bars in their central-area. Based on our observations, we describe a new genus Pletolithus, a new species Pletolithus giganteus an...
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#1Carlotta CappelliH-Index: 1
#2Claudia AgniniH-Index: 3
Last. M De Riu
view all 4 authors...
A combined light microscope-scanning electron microscope study of exceptionally well-preserved calcareous nannofossil assemblages from clay-rich middle Eocene sediments recovered at IODP Site U1410 (NW Atlantic Ocean) has enabled us to document a new evolutionary lineage within Coccolithus-like placoliths that have well-developed near-axial or diagonal cross-bars in their central-area. Based on our observations, we describe a new genus Pletolithus, a new species Pletolithus giganteus and four ne...
#1Carlotta CappelliH-Index: 1
#2Claudia AgniniH-Index: 3
Last. M De Riu
view all 4 authors...
A combined light microscope-scanning electron microscope study of exceptionally well-preserved calcareous nannofossil assemblages from clay-rich middle Eocene sediments recovered at IODP Site U1410 (NW Atlantic Ocean) has enabled us to document a new evolutionary lineage within Coccolithus-like placoliths that have well-developed near-axial or diagonal cross-bars in their central-area. Based on our observations, we describe a new genus Pletolithus, a new species Pletolithus giganteus and four ne...
#1Carlotta Cappelli (UNIPD: University of Padua)H-Index: 1
#2Paul R. Bown (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 39
Last. Claudia Agnini (UNIPD: University of Padua)H-Index: 18
view all 8 authors...
The early to middle Eocene is marked by prominent changes in calcareous nannofossil assemblages coinciding both with long‐term climate changes and modification of the North Atlantic deep‐ocean circulation. In order to assess the impact of Eocene climate change on surface‐water environmental conditions of the Northwest Atlantic, we developed calcareous nannoplankton assemblage data and bulk stable isotope records (δ18O and δ13C) across an early to middle Eocene interval (~52–43 Ma) at IODP Site U...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ben A. Ward (University of Southampton)H-Index: 17
#2Sinéad Collins (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 25
Last. Andreas OschliesH-Index: 47
view all 9 authors...
Numerical models have been highly successful in simulating global carbon and nutrient cycles in today's ocean, together with observed spatial and temporal patterns of chlorophyll and plankton biomass at the surface. With this success has come some confidence in projecting the century‐scale response to continuing anthropogenic warming. There is also increasing interest in using such models to understand the role of plankton ecosystems in past oceans. However, today's marine environment is the pro...
1 CitationsSource
#1Sarah A. Alvarez (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 1
#2Samantha J. Gibbs (NOCS: National Oceanography Centre, Southampton)H-Index: 26
Last. Andy Ridgwell (UCR: University of California, Riverside)H-Index: 53
view all 6 authors...
The Chicxulub bolide impact 66 million years ago drove the near-instantaneous collapse of ocean ecosystems. The devastating loss of diversity at the base of ocean food webs probably triggered cascading extinctions across all trophic levels1–3 and caused severe disruption of the biogeochemical functions of the ocean, and especially disrupted the cycling of carbon between the surface and deep sea4,5. The absence of sufficiently detailed biotic data that span the post-extinction interval has limite...
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#1Jeremy R. YoungH-Index: 20
#2Paul R. BownH-Index: 39
Last. David LazarusH-Index: 21
view all 6 authors...
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