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Roger L. Sheley
United States Department of Agriculture
VegetationEcologyAgroforestryAgronomyBiology
30Publications
13H-index
569Citations
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Publications 13
Newest
#1Elsie M. Denton (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 4
#2Brenda S. SmithH-Index: 8
Last. Roger L. Sheley (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 13
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ABSTRACT Our ability to restore rangelands is limited, and it is unknown if seedling herbivory on its own, or in interaction with other stressors, is a major contributor to restoration failure. To address this, we conducted two experiments: a No Defoliation (ND) experiment (n=48), in which seedlings from three perennial grasses (crested wheatgrass [Agropyron cristatum {(L.} Gaertn.], bluebunch wheatgrass [Psuedoroegnaria spicata {Pursh} A. Love], Sandberg bluegrass [Poa secunda J Presl]) were su...
5 CitationsSource
#1Erik P. Hamerlynck (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 4
#2Roger L. Sheley (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 13
Last. Tony J. Svejcar (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 35
view all 4 authors...
Developing land-use practices that lead to sustainable net primary productivity in rangelands are important, but understanding their consequences to population and community processes is not often accounted for in basic ecosystem studies. Grazed and ungrazed upland ecosystems generally do not differ in net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), but the underlying mechanisms and the concurrent effects of defoliation to vegetative and reproductive biomass allocation are unclear. To address this, we measure...
2 CitationsSource
#1Julie E. Larson (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 2
#2Roger L. Sheley (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 13
Last. Jeremy J. James (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 27
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Seedling recruitment is a critical driver of population dynamics and community assembly, yet we know little about functional traits that define different recruitment strategies. For the first time, we examined whether trait relatedness across germination and seedling stages allows the identification of general recruitment strategies which share core functional attributes and also correspond to recruitment outcomes in applied settings. We measured six seed and eight seedling traits (lab- and fiel...
14 CitationsSource
#1Erik P. Hamerlynck (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 4
#2Brenda S. Smith (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 8
Last. Tony J. Svejcar (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 35
view all 4 authors...
ABSTRACT Compensatory increases in net photosynthetic assimilation rates (Anet) following herbivory are well documented in adult rangeland grasses but have not been quantified in bunchgrass seedlings, which may be more sensitive to tissue loss than established plants. To address this, we twice removed 30% and 70% leaf area of seedlings of crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum [L.] Gaertn., var. Hycrest II) and the native bluebunch wheatgrass (Psuedoroegnaria spicata [Pursh] A. Love, var Anaton...
7 CitationsSource
#1Stuart P. Hardegree (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 29
#2Roger L. Sheley (ARS: Agricultural Research Service)H-Index: 13
Last. Gerald N. Flerchinger (ARS: Agricultural Research Service)H-Index: 31
view all 6 authors...
Sagebrush steppe ecosystems in the western United States are characterized by harsh environmental conditions with high annual and seasonal variability in both precipitation and temperature. Environmental variability contributes to widespread failure in establishing stands of desired species on degraded and invaded landscapes. To characterize seasonal microclimatic patterns and planting date effects on restoration outcomes, we evaluated long-term simulations of seed germination response of cheatg...
13 CitationsSource
The invasion by winter-annual grasses (AGs) such as Bromus tectorum into sagebrush steppe throughout the western USA is a classic example of a biological invasion with multiple, interacting climate, soil and biotic factors driving the invasion, although few studies have examined all components together. Across a 6000-km2 area of the northern Great Basin, we conducted a field assessment of 100 climate, soil, and biotic (functional group abundances, diversity) factors at each of 90 sites that span...
16 CitationsSource
#1Roger L. Sheley (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 13
#2Chad S. Boyd (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 19
Last. Jane M. Mangold (MSU: Montana State University)H-Index: 10
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1 CitationsSource
Weed prevention is recognized as one of the most cost-effective management strategies for invasive plants. In the field of invasive plant management increasing emphasis is being directed toward proactive management. However, land managers are still somewhat reluctant to aggressively employ prevention programs. Part of this reluctance could be due to lack of understanding of what a comprehensive prevention program entails. The purpose of this paper is to improve strategic decision-making for site...
Source
#1Roger L. SheleyH-Index: 13
#2Jordan L. SheleyH-Index: 1
Last. Brenda S. SmithH-Index: 8
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Abstract Prevention programs are often assumed to be the most cost-effective method for managing invasive plants. However, there is very little information available about economic and biological factors that determine the forage benefits resulting from prevention programs. We developed an easy to use economic model to assess potential savings in livestock forage that might result from implementing prevention programs. The model can be used to determine potential loss in forage production caused...
1 CitationsSource
#1Julie E. Larson (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 2
#2Roger L. Sheley (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 13
Last. Jeremy J. James (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 27
view all 5 authors...
Summary Seeding native plants is a key management practice to counter land degradation across the globe, yet the majority of seeding efforts fail, limiting our ability to accelerate ecosystem recovery. Recruitment requires transitions through several seed and seedling stages, some of which may have overriding influences on restoration outcomes. We lack, however, a general framework to understand and predict differences in these critical demographic processes across species. Functional traits inf...
43 CitationsSource
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