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Allan Pring
Flinders University
227Publications
31H-index
3,475Citations
Publications 230
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#1Allan PringH-Index: 31
#2Benjamin P. WadeH-Index: 19
Last.Nigel J. CookH-Index: 34
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The nature of couple substitutions of minor and trace element chemistry of expitaxial intergrowths of wurtzite and sphalerite are reported. EPMA and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses display significant differences in the bulk chemistries of the two epitaxial intergrowth samples studied. The sample from the Animas-Chocaya Mine complex of Bolivia is Fe-rich with mean Fe levels of 4.8 wt% for wurztite-2H and 2.3 wt% for the sphalerite component, while...
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#1Kan Li (Flinders University)H-Index: 1
#2Kan Li (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 4
Last.Joël Brugger (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 39
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Abstract The mechanisms of scavenging of minor elements in reactive, fluid-dominated systems control the distribution, nature, concentration, and reactivity of economically valuable or deleterious elements in many environments, ranging from hydrothermal ore deposits to sedimentary basins. Here we show that in a high-grade Cu-U ore from the super-giant Olympic Dam ore deposit, remobilized U was scavenged during the fluid-driven replacement of chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) by bornite (Cu5FeS4). Hydrotherm...
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#1Gujie Qian (Flinders University)H-Index: 12
#2Rong Fan (CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)H-Index: 5
Last.Andrea R. GersonH-Index: 32
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The aim of this study was to determine the combined effect of galvanic interaction and silicate addition on the dissolution of pyrite, the major contributor to acid and metalliferous drainage (AMD). Single (pyrite, sphalerite, and galena)- and bi-sulfide (pyrite–sphalerite and pyrite–galena) batch dissolution experiments were carried out with addition of 0.8 mM dissolved silicate for comparison to previously published data. The pyrite dissolution rate was reduced by 98% upon silicate addition at...
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#1Alexander Altree-Williams (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 2
#2Joël Brugger (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 39
Last.Pavel Bedrikovetsky (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 26
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Abstract Mineral dissolution flows in porous media occur in numerous industrial and natural processes. We investigate the effects of varying rock-liquid interface on mineral dissolution transport in porous media. The one-dimensional mineral-dissolution flow problem that accounts for varying reacting interface and porosity is essentially non-linear. However, a novel exact solution is derived. The exact solution reveals a four-zone structure of the flow pattern with typical mineral concentration c...
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#1Neville J. CurtisH-Index: 1
#2Jason R. GascookeH-Index: 15
Last.Allan PringH-Index: 31
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Our examination of over 230 worldwide opal samples shows that X-ray diffraction (XRD) remains the best primary method for delineation and classification of opal-A, opal-CT and opal-C, though we found that mid-range infra-red spectroscopy provides an acceptable alternative. Raman, infra-red and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy may also provide additional information to assist in classification and provenance. The corpus of results indicated that the opal-CT group covers a range of structur...
1 CitationsSource
Gold–(silver) telluride minerals constitute a major part of the gold endowment at a number of important deposits across the globe. A brief overview of the chemistry and structure of the main gold and silver telluride minerals is presented, focusing on the relationships between calaverite, krennerite, and sylvanite, which have overlapping compositions. These three minerals are replaced by gold–silver alloys when subjected to the actions of hydrothermal fluids under mild hydrothermal conditions (≤...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jing Zhao (Flinders University)H-Index: 7
#2Joël Brugger (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 39
Last.Allan Pring (Flinders University)H-Index: 31
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Abstract The replacement of magnetite by hematite was studied through a series of experiments under mild hydrothermal conditions (140–220 °C, vapour saturated pressures) to quantify the kinetics of the transformation and the relative effects of redox and non-redox processes on the transformation. The results indicate that oxygen is not an essential factor in the replacement reaction of magnetite by hematite, but the addition of excess oxidant does trigger the oxidation reaction, and increases th...
4 CitationsSource
#1Kan Li (Flinders University)H-Index: 1
#2Joël Brugger (Monash University)H-Index: 39
Last.Allan Pring (Flinders University)H-Index: 31
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Sulfide minerals host most of the world’s supplies of metals such as Cu, Ni, Co, Zn, Pb, or Mo, and understanding their crystallization, dissolution, and textural evolution is key to understanding the formation of mineral deposits, metal recovery via metallurgy, and their environmental impact. Despite the prominence of hydrothermally formed sulfide minerals, the interpretation of textures in sulfide petrology relies mainly on comparison with results from experiments conducted under dry condition...
2 CitationsSource
#1Alexander Altree-Williams (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 2
#2Joël Brugger (Monash University)H-Index: 39
Last.Pavel Bedrikovetsky (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 26
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We derive exact solution for mineral-dissolution reactive flows in porous media with porosity variations. These conditions are relevant to injection of incompatible liquids into aquifers for disposal or waste storage, rock alteration during well stimulation by acidising or invasion of corrosive, far-from-equilibrium fluids related to ore deposit formation and heap or in situ leaching in mineral processing. Despite the porosity change making the one-dimensional flow equations nonlinear, the probl...
2 CitationsSource
#1Amy Roberts (Flinders University)H-Index: 7
#2Heather Burke (Flinders University)H-Index: 8
Last.Catherine Bland (Flinders University)
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Abstract This paper presents the results of analyses of rock coatings from Pudjinuk Rockshelter No. 2 in South Australia (SA) using the following methods: 1) Raman microscopy; 2) X-ray powder diffraction; and 3) Scanning electron microscopy coupled with integrated energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The deposits analysed contained a mixture of thenardite, glauberite, halite, sylvinite, gypsum, probable palygorskite and amorphous carbon. The engravings previously extant at the rockshelter are a...
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